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Creating Results is a full-service strategic marketing, public relations and advertising agency with more than 15 years of experience. Our expertise is motivating mature 40+ consumers, including Baby Boomers, Silent (Ike) Generation and Gen X.
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Can You Communicate the Landis Way? Senior Living Spotlight, Part Three

August 26th, 2014 Posted by Beth Spohn

“We can’t be creative – senior living is such a highly regulated industry.”

“Our communications are so challenging. We have adult kids AND seniors.”

Stay Fly Shop - what senior living can learn from global leadersAs Creating Results spoke to senior living conferences this year, sharing the best practices of global leaders like Southwest and Nordstrom, we heard a lot of reasons for why senior living communities didn’t have consumer-friendly information.

We pointed out that airlines are indeed highly regulated businesses. Then we offered an inspirational example from within senior living: Pennsylvania’s Landis Communities.

For the last section in our “senior spotlight series” (links below for parts 1 and 2), Larry Guengerich, Director of Communications & Church Relations for Landis, provided some insights into how Landis Communities leadership ‘allows’ team members to be creative. How do they keep it simple and display such joy within a highly regulated environment?

Intentional Consumer-Centered Culture

Guengerich sums it up:

“You can’t build a culture of trust by force of will – it grows over time. But you can damage it quickly. The leadership team has to talk openly, then you can create space to be joyful and creative. Be intentional – it is not happenstance.”Team with thought bubbles

Creating Results couldn’t agree more! When working with our clients to reposition their community or to implement a marketing initiative, we’ve found building a common understanding with all community stakeholders – board members to CNAs, as well as residents and their families – ensures the greatest success.

Landis does this to make sure that EVERYONE in the organization understands the big picture of how they can each affect the lives of older adults.

The Landis “Communicate, Communicate, Communicate” Strategy

Guengerich recommends:

1. Members of the leadership team should hold “Conversations with the President:

  • Hold the CONVERSATIONS during every shift.
  • Make it paid time and the meetings will be well received, well attended and productive dialogs. The objective is to hear ideas for improving residents and employees lives by encouraging open, productive dialogs with all employees.

2. Understand and respect your multiple audiences. For example with team members, not everyone is comfortable sharing with “the boss” in an open forum. So set up an email that goes directly to the president. Then read and respond to every email.

3. Keep communications clear and consistent:

  • Compile answers into a FAQ document.
  • Distribute FAQs through multiple channels to all audiences (with tweaks as needed) – newsletter, website, community boards, and more.

4. Multiple-channel communications are important during major projects as they:

  • Encourage open dialog,
  • Create a sense of community.
  • Put people at ease.

Your Turn

Does your organization have a great “communicate, communicate, communicate” strategy? Use the comments section below to let us know, so we can share it!

A very grateful thank you to Larry Guengerich of Landis Communities for sharing his experiences and perspectives!

 

RELATED:

* Part 1: How Landis Excels at Customer-Friendly Service, Information

* Part 2: What it Means to be Values-Driven

* Aligning Brand with Mission – slides from the 2012 LeadingAge Annual Meeting, with insights on the “alchemy” between culture and brand

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Class In Session

August 25th, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Around the US, many elementary and secondary education kids are going back to school this week. Seemed an appropriate theme for this week’s round-up of links and resources for mature marketing “kids”!

ELDER logo1. MOST CLICKED: Todd Harff and I are thrilled to be teaching a course for Lasell College: Developing a Mature Consumer Strategy. Designed for professionals in elder services, the class will cover the fundamentals of strategic marketing so that emerging leaders can understand and support organizational marketing efforts. 

The course is offered through the new E.L.D.E.R. certificate program at Lasell. E.L.D.E.R. features eldercare and 50+ market experts from retirement communities, day health, adult learning and more teaching alongside Lasell’s excellent faculty. The result is a variety of unique management learning experiences, and Creating Results is proud to be a part of this initiative.

Find out more: http://bit.ly/1ntoElT

2. Several people clicked through to read what LifeHealthPro, an online resource for life and health insurance providers, suggested in its educational post called “5 Ways to Sell to Seniors.” Their tips include:

- Differentiate yourself online - agreed! (Insights for doing so: http://amzn.to/HSH0yD)

- Be patient, not pushy - agreed!

- Be an educator - agreed! (Our thoughts on baby boomers & lifelong learning: http://bit.ly/1soJxla)

I like to participate in classes, so I cheekily suggested a 6th way to sell to seniors: skip those tired, stock photos. (The article had a few, sadly.)

Read the item in LifeHealthPro: http://bit.ly/1p5m312

3. MOST SHARED: It never fails. At the end of a week, the tweets that are most frequently retweeted or favorited (another way of sharing with your followers) are those in which we thank people! We express our gratitude to someone for becoming a follower, or for sharing one of our posts, or for sharing great content … and they will RT or favorite that item.

What lesson can you learn from the behavior of this class?

Never underestimate the power of a “thank you.” Especially with Silent Generation seniors, who were raised in an era where manners mattered. Do your sales and marketing team members thank folks for their time? For their referrals? For attending an event? For considering your brand  (even if they didn’t purchase)?

In The Cluetrain Manifesto, thesis #2 is that “Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors.” A “thank you” is a great way to connect with the humans your brand wants to motivate.

thank you blog post

How frequently does your brand say “thank you,” on- and offline?

 

With that, I want to THANK YOU for subscribing to this blog! Happy Monday!

What It Means to Be Values-Driven: Senior Living Spotlight, Part Two

August 21st, 2014 Posted by Beth Spohn

Joy, Compassion, Integrity, Stewardship, & Community. These were the values that Pennsylvania’s Landis Communities uncovered as they set out strategically to build an organization that excels in customer-friendly service and information.

For this “senior living spotlight” series, we talked to Larry Guengerich, Director of Communications & Church Relations at Landis. He says those values aren’t just stated. They drive everything Landis does.

Putting Values Into Practice

Be the kind of leader that you would follow.Values Based Leadership: It is easy to just attribute an organization’s success to a single charismatic leader. But Guengerich says that what makes Landis successful is that it takes a TEAM. “The entire leadership team (director level and up) uses the principles of ‘Values Based Leadership.’”

Landis is one of the 17 members of the Anabaptist Providers Group (APG) that trains employees and helps instill their values within all aspects of leadership development. They also make attending and participating at conferences a priority. Being active in APG, LeadingAge and other organizations brings value to the Landis organization as well.

Marketing: You’re not following Landis Homes on Facebook? Then you’re missing a master-class in values-driven communications. A great share on YouTube explaining their stream restoration project: http://youtu.be/S44V9QtQDQg

Recruiting: Before hiring for a new position, Landis’ leadership thinks carefully about the type of people they are seeking: This is true for ANY person – a high school intern to the CFO.

They want to find people that exhibit joy in their work as well as Landis’ other values. As Guengerich notes, “You can train someone to have skills to perform a job, but it is much more difficult to teach someone values.”Landis Communities employees on Saint Patrick's Day

Landis’ HR team or, the “value finders” are responsible for identifying new employees that fit this bill.

Each candidate receives a copy of the mission and vision statement at their interview. They are asked to pick one of the values that they feel their closest family and friends would say they emulate, and describe a time they exhibited that value.

After team members are hired, Landis celebrates the small victories with ice cream, free meals, coupons, public recognition of their time in service and more.

Partnerships: One of Landis’ latest projects, Steeple View Lofts, shows how forming unique partnerships creates innovative and customer-friendly offerings.

As many senior living organizations know, not everyone can (or wants) to move to a traditional CCRC in the suburbs. Landis’ solution was to develop an apartment community with amenities within downtown Lancaster, PA. Steeple View Lofts has retail space, an art gallery and ample common space that helps create a greater sense of community among residents. Not to mention amazing views from the apartments!

Steeple View Lofts, Lancaster

Landis created this high quality housing thanks to a partnership. A land planning developer working with Landis on another project happened to meet a developer interested in purchasing the old tobacco warehouse. Landis’ vision was so clear that the developer was compelled to make an introduction to Larry Zook, CEO of Landis Communities, and Steeple View was born.

Guengerich’s Three Tips for Value-Driven Partnerships

1. Be intentional – look for partners that can help the organization answer “WHERE ARE WE HEADED.”

2. Make creating partnerships a strategic goal. That gives your team the “right and the duty” to explore and form them.

3. Meet with LOTS of groups/people, but set some parameters. You never know how or when the planting of a partnership seed will grow into a value tree.

Larry said it this way: “Take a meeting with someone even if you don’t have a clear idea of what the end result will be, but stay within a couple hour drive for in-person meetings.”

Your Turn

Do you share your organization’s mission, vision and values with your partners? What kind of amplification have you seen from doing that?

Please use the comments section below to contribute. Or stop by our booth (#524) at the LeadingAge Ohio conference next week, and share your thoughts in person!

RELATED:

* Part 1: How Landis Excels at Customer-Friendly Service, Information

* Hear Todd Harff speak about partnership marketing at the 2014 LeadingAge national conference in Nashville

How Landis Communities Excels at Consumer-Friendly Service, Information: Senior Living Spotlight, Part One

August 20th, 2014 Posted by Beth Spohn

This year, Creating Results has been privileged to speak at senior living conferences around the country. Our “Stay, Fly, Shop to Success” presentation highlights some common strengths of global leaders such as Marriott, Southwest and Nordstrom. Why? It helps to find inspiration for success outside your industry.

We also highlight inspiring leaders within senior living. Pennsylvania’s Landis Communities is an organization that excels at customer-friendly service and information.Landis Communities logo

How does Landis Communities excel at fostering a consumer-centric culture? Larry Guengerich, Director of Communications & Church Relations, recently said that the short answer is … It’s not easy. Rather it’s done carefully with thoughtfulness and intention.

In this three-part series, we’ll try to figure out Landis’ “secret sauce.” Guengerich says it starts with mission statements and defined values. Then they mix in recruiting, leadership and marketing. And finally it’s cooked through with a strong multichannel, multi-audience communications strategy.

Step 1: Craft a mission statement that is qualitative and actionable. Identify and clearly articulate your vision and values.

Beyond Buzzwords

From the story Guengerich  shared about how Landis’ mission evolved. it’s critical that a mission statement resonate with all stakeholders and is broad enough to guide for several years to come. Landis Communities’ mission and vision aren’t just a bunch of buzzwords, rather a formulization of what was already in their hearts and helps focus the organization to achieve their mission.

“Following God’s call to creatively serve the diverse needs and interests of older adults by developing opportunities and collaborative relationships.”

Vision Quest

From the Landis Communities website:

Landis Communities … remains committed to the vision present at its beginning while preparing for growth and change during the years to come. We are committed to keeping retirement living strong and vital. To providing a number of Affordable Living options, including new models of age 55+ active adult living in the city of Lancaster and elsewhere. To provide services at home – supporting aging in place, and to develop creative partnerships in support of all of these areas.

As in the mission-statement, it’s full of consumer-centered language, with references to creativity, service and relationships.

The Value of Listening

Landis Communities value treeFor Landis Communities, the first step in reviewing their strategic plan was to listen. They conducted a “listening tour” with key stakeholders including residents, family, employees, board members, and the larger Lancaster community. What did they hear?

The same words from many stakeholders – and those words became their core values: Joy, Compassion, Integrity, Stewardship, & Community.

The values were already there. Now they were clearly articulated and the team could set about intentionally to live the values.

(One team member creatively gave the values a true life, planting the values tree you see at left!)

Your Turn:

* If you or your board of directors went on a “listening tour” what would stakeholders say your organization’s values were?  Would you consistently hear the same words?
* If you have done a “listening tour,” were you surprised by what you heard?

Please share your insights below!

RELATED: Resources and inspiration related to our Stay, Fly, Shop presentation at LeadingAge Pennsylvania

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Emotion and Email

August 18th, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday.  Let’s jump right into the mature marketing stories of the past week that had people talking and clicking.  Have something to add, please don’t forget to add to the comment section.

MOST CLICKED: We have fEmotionound time and time again that creating an emotional connection is critical when marketing to mature consumers.  A recent article reinforced this idea, showcasing how three brands effectively use emotion to drive behavior.

Each of the brands highlighted use their messaging to create a strong emotional response by touching on a topic or desire that will resonate with people and, hopefully, increase the desire to purchase their products.

So how can you effectively harness the power of emotion?  The author offered these tips:

* Get to know your audience: Let your metrics be your guide to determine how people are engaging online with your brand.
* Understand your audience: Do your homework to gain insights into behaviors, motivators, etc.
* Define your strategy: Set goals in advance that will help define the avenues you use and how your campaign will take shape.

 

MOST SHARED: 86% of digital marketers use email marketing regularly. This along with other stats detailing how email remains an important marketing avenue were featured in a recent eMarketer article.
The article incorporated data from several studies and looked at the impact of email across all stages of the purchase funnel, calling it:
…the single most effective—for reaching all goals, including awareness (41% of respondents), acquisition (37%), conversion (42%) and retention (56%).
Because of these results, many marketers are increasing their email marketing budgets, specifically in mobile optimization.

Boomer Purchases
WORTH REPEATING: 
Another great eMarketer article that we shared last week didn’t receive as many clicks or shares, but contains valuable insights for marketing to boomers and seniors.  It details what products/services baby boomers and seniors buy online and noted that even if they see a product in-store that they like, they are likely to go home, research and ultimately purchase.  Read the full article here.

 

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Long Term Care, Short Term Travel

August 11th, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Time once again for Creating Results’ mature marketing round-up, a collection of resources which garnered the most attention via Twitter, Google + and other platforms in the past week.

(Not engaged with us yet on these social networks? Please use the links above to connect.)

1. MOST SHARED: Financial planner Jill Schlesinger reminds readers that an aging America means an increase in need for long-term care. And an increase in costs.

“According to the 2014 Medicare & You, the national Medicare handbook … at least 70 percent of people over 65 years old will need long-term care services and support at some point … Unfortunately, many do not realize that Medicare and most health insurance plans, including Medicare supplement insurance (Medigap) policies, don’t pay for this type of care, sometimes called custodial care.”

Read the item in Newsday: http://nwsdy.li/Vfhzxs

2. MOST CLICKED: What is a “Celebration Vacation”? It’s a journey taken to mark a milestone, such as a birthday, anniversary or wedding. And it’s a growing trend with baby boomers, per AARP.Seniors spend money on travel, including travel with grandchildren or girlfriends.

“Nearly eight-in-ten (78 percent) of Baby Boomers over the age of 45 report they have taken or intend to take a Celebration Vacation in the next two years, the survey finds. ‘Travel is the number one aspirational activity for the boomer generation,’ noted AARP Chief Digital Officer Sami Hassanyeh.”

Aspirational travel as a trend isn’t news to Creating Results. Reunions and multigenerational trips were one of the segments identified in our strategic marketing plan for the Village of Valemount, a charming destination in the Canadian Rockies. (Click here to read a case study related to this award-winning project.)

In 2012, we helped client Traditions of America spread the word about a group of homeowners who frequently celebrate friendship via “girlfriend getaways.” And check out the travel category on this blog for more insights.

Read more about AARP’s baby boomer travel survey: http://bit.ly/1kW7oKD.

3. Also of note: Though they trail younger age groups, boomers do use digital tools for shopping (eMarketer): http://bit.ly/1B8B2B5 

Note that while online research is up, baby boomers are still more likely to to use offline resources than younger groups and less likely to rely on social media.

Chart - product research sources used by Millennials and Baby Boomers

We’d love to hear your thoughts on these mature marketing items. Please leave a comment below!

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Pop Icons and Pdfs

August 4th, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday!  The mature marketing news that had people talking over the last week is brought to you by the letter “P”.  Have something to share?  Be sure to note in the comments below.senior calenar

“P” is for Pop Icons:  Beloved pop culture icons and moments in movie history including The Beatles, Wizard of Oz and I Love Lucy were given a new look within a calendar created by residents of Senior Living Communities.  Participants designed their own costumes and sets and even used green screen to bring a little movie-magic to the project.

Members were thrilled with being asked to not only participate by to use their vision to create memorable scenes.  Some Members were even asked for their autograph after the shoot!  They felt like movie stars.

See the pictures and discover how you can create a fun project that excites and involves residents of your community.

“P” is for PDF: An article highlighting the pros and cons of pdfs from an SEO stand-point garnered a lot of interest this past week.  In the article the author explored how (and why) PDFs are valuable, as well and some drawbacks to use within your website.

Pros

* By incorporating clickable links within your PDFs you are giving site visitors yet another way to dive deeper into your website.

*Your content can be indexed and read by search engines when originally created as a text document.

Cons

* Excessive use of PDFs can make it difficult for your visitors to get back to your website, as they typically don’t include site navigation (thus the importance of including links within your content.)

*From an analytic standpoint it can be difficult to track engagement with the piece.

View other pros and cons here.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Viral Videos and PR Success

July 28th, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday!  The mature marketing stories and articles of the past week that garnered the most interest focused on tips and tricks for making your marketing efforts as successful as possible.  Have something to add?  Be sure to share it in the comment section below.

MOST SHARED: You can learn a lot from music groups regarding how to make your videos viral sensations, according to a recent ReelSEO article.  The article examined success of the group OK GO, who in a period of just six days received over 1 million views their music video.  By looking at tViral Video tipsheir approach the author offered tips that can be applied when creating your own videos to promote your brand or organization, including:

* Keep It Simple: You don’t need to be flashy to be impactful and interesting.

*Make it Relatable: Know your audience and what matters most to them and incorporate within your video, you’ll encourage more shares and expand your reach.

Read the full story here.

MOST CLICKED: According to PR Newswire, over 1 million press releases were sent through the online service in the last year. For a marketer, that translates to a great deal of competition for coverage.  The service recently conducted a review of the releases to determine the perfect recipe for success in driving the best results. The finding: the more visual the better.

The results are clear – visuals drive more content views, and adding multiple media assets to your content (press releases, and anything else you publish online, for that matter) generates even better results.

In fact, according the their research, half of the top performing releases included visual elements. By incorporating as many visuals as possible you can help stories gain attention in a variety of mediums, encourage social sharing and help connect your story to your audience and make it more appealing.

Read more here.

What do you do to make your news stand out?  We’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

 

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Encore Jobs and Marketing Flashbacks

July 21st, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Chart - living US veterans by age group

 

On this date in 1930, President Herbert Hoover established the Veterans Administration. There are an estimated 21,972,964 living US Veterans, and it’s a decidedly gray group — 72% are over the age of 50.

As we wrote on this blog back in 2009, senior veterans are educated, adaptable and everywhere. Since that post another half a million veterans entered the 65+ block, which means their health needs are have only increased.

(Does your organization’s marketing program consider the values and perspectives of elder veterans?)

Don’t want until November 11 to thank a Veteran. Do it today.

 

Now, on to the week’s top mature marketing links.

1. MOST SHARED: Roughly 9 million Americans over 44 are working in “encore” jobs, using skills and earning a living, reports the Chicago Tribune. Some do so by choice — this is how they want to spend their retirement. Others by necessity — they found themselves involuntarily retired.

“… 9% of the 100 million people [ages 44 to 70] work in encore jobs, according to a 2011 survey by Encore.org, a nonprofit organization, and the MetLife foundation. An additional 31 million would like to …

The share of older Americans in the workforce has risen sharply since the mid-1990s, and polls show millions of people plan to work in years that once were classified as retirement.”

Read the article: http://trib.in/WyunAu

RELATED: Un-Retiring Presidents

2. MOST CLICKED: McKinsey & Company recently posted an article from its archives — 1966, to be precise — that looked at the “changing face of marketing.” The analysis of six major trends struck a chord with me … and with Creating Results’ followers on Twitter who clicked through and responded.

Many of the changes identified by McKinsey consultant John D. Louth in 1966 continue to be strong forces in marketing today.

1. The dominance of the customer - Louth wrote that “the end users of almost every company’s products are shifting in makeup, location, and number at an ever-increasing rate. The significance of this to senior marketing executives is twofold: First, they cannot—indeed, they must not—assume that yesterday’s customers will be available tomorrow. Second, they had better be certain that they have adequate sources of market information.”

Todd Harff and I have stressed this point in a series of presentations to senior living associations this year. Pointing out the best practices of global brands such as Nordstrom and Marriott, we emphasize that continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) cannot base today’s selections and offerings on what residents who moved in 10 years ago like. Or even those who arrived 2 years ago. CCRCs must be thinking of what people who will move in 2 years from now want.

2. The spread of marketing research - “Beyond this value in reporting on historical and current conditions, however, I see a trend toward increased use of marketing research as a creative tool to help solve future management problems.” Well put, Mr. Louth!

3. The rise of the computer - “Generally speaking, I think it must be conceded that companies have dragged their feet in taking advantage of electronic data-processing analyses, online communications, and information-retrieval systems as tools to help make marketing more efficient.” The more things change …

4. Expanded use of test marketing - Louth notes that with rising costs of introducing new products and packaging and training salespeople, market tests can “narrow the odds of an error.”

5. Metamorphosis of field selling - Could Louth have imagined today’s network marketing? Every month I am invited to join or host a house party featuring baskets, jewelry, kitchen ware, natural skin care. At times the “party” is a one-day event promoted on Facebook.

6. Global market planning - “For the smaller company, this trend may emphasize the need to establish or strengthen export relationships so that it too may market on a worldwide basis. For many larger companies, it points to a day when the United States may be merely a domestic division within the worldwide corporation,” wrote Louth. Even CCRCs are not immune to globalization. The smartest ones are looking at what innovative, successful ideas are being implemented around the world, and then applying those learnings closer to home.

Read McKinsey’s archive feature: http://bit.ly/1kLELdB

The piece got a few of us flashing back, as you can see in this exchange with George Harben, of Prince William County Economic Development.

tweet exchange

 

Then George won the internet with the video he shared:

What do you think of the 6 marketing changes ID’d by McKinsey in 1966? Do they resonate with your challenges today? Please share your insights below.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Is that All You Blighters Can Do?

July 14th, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Words! Words! Words! I’m so sick of words! 
I get words all day through;
First from him, now from you! 
Is that all you blighters can do? 

My teenage daughter and I watched the wonderful musical My Fair Lady this weekend. The Lerner & Loewe song “Show Me” seemed to perfectly capture the sentiment of last week’s top mature marketing links.

There’s Freddie, full of best intentions, desperately trying to connect with Eliza through passionate prose. There’s Eliza, tired of talking. If the movie were made today, she’d likely respond with Elvis’ “A Little Less Conversation (a lot more action).” Instead Eliza demands: “don’t waste my time, show me!”

Have mature marketers been too worried about the words, words, words they use? The items that got the most shares, clicks and comments last week had to do with the language of aging.

1. MOST SHARED: ”Updating the Language of Aging,” an article by LeadingAge’s Jane Sherwin about why language is so important in the senior living industry.  Sherwin shows how leading providers are not just picking words that don’t offend but are choosing those that will uplift and empower.

Michelle Seitzer of SeniorsForLiving summed it up when she shared the link:

updating-language-of-aging-tweet

Can words change the world? Read the piece at http://bit.ly/1mwDomu.

2. MOST COMMENTED: “Banana-fana Fo-senior …The Name Game and 50+ Marketing.”

This post on this blog generated some great discussion. We shared the results of two surveys related to the language of aging — namely, which words are loathed and which are liked. (No age-related labels seem to really be loved.)

Deb Unger is definitely in the show me camp. She wrote on the blog:

“Don’t market to my age. If you do you are in essence telling me what I should like or use based on my age. Market to a person instead and let me decide if it’s for me regardless of my age.”

Ronni Bennett, elderblogger, journalist and source of one of the two polls, countered:

“I don’t agree that descriptive words for old people shouldn’t refer to their age. There are a zillion reasons stories, reports and advertising need to target by age – sometimes for medications or for over-the-counter products (I, at 73, don’t need acne cream and it’s a waste of advertisers’ money to include me) and any reporter would be negligent to not declare teen, young adult, elder, etc. when they don’t have an age to report.”

The conversation’s just begun. Add your two cents here: http://bit.ly/1oVuRtA

3. Also of note:  No matter what marketers choose to call older adults, we can connect by understanding the stress they’re under and showing them we have solutions. NPR Health had a fine series of reports on stress last week.

What stresses older adults? Health problems are the dominant concern for seniors, while money is tops for baby boomers.

Table - Reasons for Stress by age group - NPR, Robert Wood Johnson, Harvard Health

The study was conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. Read more here: http://n.pr/1jHUM9q

 

My solution to stress? Curling up on the couch with my kids and a good movie. And singing along with Eliza as she uses words to change her world.


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