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Creating Results is a full-service strategic marketing, public relations and advertising agency with more than 15 years of experience. Our expertise is motivating mature 40+ consumers, including Baby Boomers, Silent (Ike) Generation and Gen X.
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How Landis Communities Excels at Consumer-Friendly Service, Information: Senior Living Spotlight, Part One

August 20th, 2014 Posted by Beth Spohn

This year, Creating Results has been privileged to speak at senior living conferences around the country. Our “Stay, Fly, Shop to Success” presentation highlights some common strengths of global leaders such as Marriott, Southwest and Nordstrom. Why? It helps to find inspiration for success outside your industry.

We also highlight inspiring leaders within senior living. Pennsylvania’s Landis Communities is an organization that excels at customer-friendly service and information.Landis Communities logo

How does Landis Communities excel at fostering a consumer-centric culture? Larry Guengerich, Director of Communications & Church Relations, recently said that the short answer is … It’s not easy. Rather it’s done carefully with thoughtfulness and intention.

In this three-part series, we’ll try to figure out Landis’ “secret sauce.” Guengerich says it starts with mission statements and defined values. Then they mix in recruiting, leadership and marketing. And finally it’s cooked through with a strong multichannel, multi-audience communications strategy.

Step 1: Craft a mission statement that is qualitative and actionable. Identify and clearly articulate your vision and values.

Beyond Buzzwords

From the story Guengerich  shared about how Landis’ mission evolved. it’s critical that a mission statement resonate with all stakeholders and is broad enough to guide for several years to come. Landis Communities’ mission and vision aren’t just a bunch of buzzwords, rather a formulization of what was already in their hearts and helps focus the organization to achieve their mission.

“Following God’s call to creatively serve the diverse needs and interests of older adults by developing opportunities and collaborative relationships.”

Vision Quest

From the Landis Communities website:

Landis Communities … remains committed to the vision present at its beginning while preparing for growth and change during the years to come. We are committed to keeping retirement living strong and vital. To providing a number of Affordable Living options, including new models of age 55+ active adult living in the city of Lancaster and elsewhere. To provide services at home – supporting aging in place, and to develop creative partnerships in support of all of these areas.

As in the mission-statement, it’s full of consumer-centered language, with references to creativity, service and relationships.

The Value of Listening

Landis Communities value treeFor Landis Communities, the first step in reviewing their strategic plan was to listen. They conducted a “listening tour” with key stakeholders including residents, family, employees, board members, and the larger Lancaster community. What did they hear?

The same words from many stakeholders – and those words became their core values: Joy, Compassion, Integrity, Stewardship, & Community.

The values were already there. Now they were clearly articulated and the team could set about intentionally to live the values.

(One team member creatively gave the values a true life, planting the values tree you see at left!)

Your Turn:

* If you or your board of directors went on a “listening tour” what would stakeholders say your organization’s values were?  Would you consistently hear the same words?
* If you have done a “listening tour,” were you surprised by what you heard?

Please share your insights below!

RELATED: Resources and inspiration related to our Stay, Fly, Shop presentation at LeadingAge Pennsylvania

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Emotion and Email

August 18th, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday.  Let’s jump right into the mature marketing stories of the past week that had people talking and clicking.  Have something to add, please don’t forget to add to the comment section.

MOST CLICKED: We have fEmotionound time and time again that creating an emotional connection is critical when marketing to mature consumers.  A recent article reinforced this idea, showcasing how three brands effectively use emotion to drive behavior.

Each of the brands highlighted use their messaging to create a strong emotional response by touching on a topic or desire that will resonate with people and, hopefully, increase the desire to purchase their products.

So how can you effectively harness the power of emotion?  The author offered these tips:

* Get to know your audience: Let your metrics be your guide to determine how people are engaging online with your brand.
* Understand your audience: Do your homework to gain insights into behaviors, motivators, etc.
* Define your strategy: Set goals in advance that will help define the avenues you use and how your campaign will take shape.

 

MOST SHARED: 86% of digital marketers use email marketing regularly. This along with other stats detailing how email remains an important marketing avenue were featured in a recent eMarketer article.
The article incorporated data from several studies and looked at the impact of email across all stages of the purchase funnel, calling it:
…the single most effective—for reaching all goals, including awareness (41% of respondents), acquisition (37%), conversion (42%) and retention (56%).
Because of these results, many marketers are increasing their email marketing budgets, specifically in mobile optimization.

Boomer Purchases
WORTH REPEATING: 
Another great eMarketer article that we shared last week didn’t receive as many clicks or shares, but contains valuable insights for marketing to boomers and seniors.  It details what products/services baby boomers and seniors buy online and noted that even if they see a product in-store that they like, they are likely to go home, research and ultimately purchase.  Read the full article here.

 

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Long Term Care, Short Term Travel

August 11th, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Time once again for Creating Results’ mature marketing round-up, a collection of resources which garnered the most attention via Twitter, Google + and other platforms in the past week.

(Not engaged with us yet on these social networks? Please use the links above to connect.)

1. MOST SHARED: Financial planner Jill Schlesinger reminds readers that an aging America means an increase in need for long-term care. And an increase in costs.

“According to the 2014 Medicare & You, the national Medicare handbook … at least 70 percent of people over 65 years old will need long-term care services and support at some point … Unfortunately, many do not realize that Medicare and most health insurance plans, including Medicare supplement insurance (Medigap) policies, don’t pay for this type of care, sometimes called custodial care.”

Read the item in Newsday: http://nwsdy.li/Vfhzxs

2. MOST CLICKED: What is a “Celebration Vacation”? It’s a journey taken to mark a milestone, such as a birthday, anniversary or wedding. And it’s a growing trend with baby boomers, per AARP.Seniors spend money on travel, including travel with grandchildren or girlfriends.

“Nearly eight-in-ten (78 percent) of Baby Boomers over the age of 45 report they have taken or intend to take a Celebration Vacation in the next two years, the survey finds. ‘Travel is the number one aspirational activity for the boomer generation,’ noted AARP Chief Digital Officer Sami Hassanyeh.”

Aspirational travel as a trend isn’t news to Creating Results. Reunions and multigenerational trips were one of the segments identified in our strategic marketing plan for the Village of Valemount, a charming destination in the Canadian Rockies. (Click here to read a case study related to this award-winning project.)

In 2012, we helped client Traditions of America spread the word about a group of homeowners who frequently celebrate friendship via “girlfriend getaways.” And check out the travel category on this blog for more insights.

Read more about AARP’s baby boomer travel survey: http://bit.ly/1kW7oKD.

3. Also of note: Though they trail younger age groups, boomers do use digital tools for shopping (eMarketer): http://bit.ly/1B8B2B5 

Note that while online research is up, baby boomers are still more likely to to use offline resources than younger groups and less likely to rely on social media.

Chart - product research sources used by Millennials and Baby Boomers

We’d love to hear your thoughts on these mature marketing items. Please leave a comment below!

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Pop Icons and Pdfs

August 4th, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday!  The mature marketing news that had people talking over the last week is brought to you by the letter “P”.  Have something to share?  Be sure to note in the comments below.senior calenar

“P” is for Pop Icons:  Beloved pop culture icons and moments in movie history including The Beatles, Wizard of Oz and I Love Lucy were given a new look within a calendar created by residents of Senior Living Communities.  Participants designed their own costumes and sets and even used green screen to bring a little movie-magic to the project.

Members were thrilled with being asked to not only participate by to use their vision to create memorable scenes.  Some Members were even asked for their autograph after the shoot!  They felt like movie stars.

See the pictures and discover how you can create a fun project that excites and involves residents of your community.

“P” is for PDF: An article highlighting the pros and cons of pdfs from an SEO stand-point garnered a lot of interest this past week.  In the article the author explored how (and why) PDFs are valuable, as well and some drawbacks to use within your website.

Pros

* By incorporating clickable links within your PDFs you are giving site visitors yet another way to dive deeper into your website.

*Your content can be indexed and read by search engines when originally created as a text document.

Cons

* Excessive use of PDFs can make it difficult for your visitors to get back to your website, as they typically don’t include site navigation (thus the importance of including links within your content.)

*From an analytic standpoint it can be difficult to track engagement with the piece.

View other pros and cons here.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Viral Videos and PR Success

July 28th, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday!  The mature marketing stories and articles of the past week that garnered the most interest focused on tips and tricks for making your marketing efforts as successful as possible.  Have something to add?  Be sure to share it in the comment section below.

MOST SHARED: You can learn a lot from music groups regarding how to make your videos viral sensations, according to a recent ReelSEO article.  The article examined success of the group OK GO, who in a period of just six days received over 1 million views their music video.  By looking at tViral Video tipsheir approach the author offered tips that can be applied when creating your own videos to promote your brand or organization, including:

* Keep It Simple: You don’t need to be flashy to be impactful and interesting.

*Make it Relatable: Know your audience and what matters most to them and incorporate within your video, you’ll encourage more shares and expand your reach.

Read the full story here.

MOST CLICKED: According to PR Newswire, over 1 million press releases were sent through the online service in the last year. For a marketer, that translates to a great deal of competition for coverage.  The service recently conducted a review of the releases to determine the perfect recipe for success in driving the best results. The finding: the more visual the better.

The results are clear – visuals drive more content views, and adding multiple media assets to your content (press releases, and anything else you publish online, for that matter) generates even better results.

In fact, according the their research, half of the top performing releases included visual elements. By incorporating as many visuals as possible you can help stories gain attention in a variety of mediums, encourage social sharing and help connect your story to your audience and make it more appealing.

Read more here.

What do you do to make your news stand out?  We’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

 

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Encore Jobs and Marketing Flashbacks

July 21st, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Chart - living US veterans by age group

 

On this date in 1930, President Herbert Hoover established the Veterans Administration. There are an estimated 21,972,964 living US Veterans, and it’s a decidedly gray group — 72% are over the age of 50.

As we wrote on this blog back in 2009, senior veterans are educated, adaptable and everywhere. Since that post another half a million veterans entered the 65+ block, which means their health needs are have only increased.

(Does your organization’s marketing program consider the values and perspectives of elder veterans?)

Don’t want until November 11 to thank a Veteran. Do it today.

 

Now, on to the week’s top mature marketing links.

1. MOST SHARED: Roughly 9 million Americans over 44 are working in “encore” jobs, using skills and earning a living, reports the Chicago Tribune. Some do so by choice — this is how they want to spend their retirement. Others by necessity — they found themselves involuntarily retired.

“… 9% of the 100 million people [ages 44 to 70] work in encore jobs, according to a 2011 survey by Encore.org, a nonprofit organization, and the MetLife foundation. An additional 31 million would like to …

The share of older Americans in the workforce has risen sharply since the mid-1990s, and polls show millions of people plan to work in years that once were classified as retirement.”

Read the article: http://trib.in/WyunAu

RELATED: Un-Retiring Presidents

2. MOST CLICKED: McKinsey & Company recently posted an article from its archives — 1966, to be precise — that looked at the “changing face of marketing.” The analysis of six major trends struck a chord with me … and with Creating Results’ followers on Twitter who clicked through and responded.

Many of the changes identified by McKinsey consultant John D. Louth in 1966 continue to be strong forces in marketing today.

1. The dominance of the customer - Louth wrote that “the end users of almost every company’s products are shifting in makeup, location, and number at an ever-increasing rate. The significance of this to senior marketing executives is twofold: First, they cannot—indeed, they must not—assume that yesterday’s customers will be available tomorrow. Second, they had better be certain that they have adequate sources of market information.”

Todd Harff and I have stressed this point in a series of presentations to senior living associations this year. Pointing out the best practices of global brands such as Nordstrom and Marriott, we emphasize that continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) cannot base today’s selections and offerings on what residents who moved in 10 years ago like. Or even those who arrived 2 years ago. CCRCs must be thinking of what people who will move in 2 years from now want.

2. The spread of marketing research - “Beyond this value in reporting on historical and current conditions, however, I see a trend toward increased use of marketing research as a creative tool to help solve future management problems.” Well put, Mr. Louth!

3. The rise of the computer - “Generally speaking, I think it must be conceded that companies have dragged their feet in taking advantage of electronic data-processing analyses, online communications, and information-retrieval systems as tools to help make marketing more efficient.” The more things change …

4. Expanded use of test marketing - Louth notes that with rising costs of introducing new products and packaging and training salespeople, market tests can “narrow the odds of an error.”

5. Metamorphosis of field selling - Could Louth have imagined today’s network marketing? Every month I am invited to join or host a house party featuring baskets, jewelry, kitchen ware, natural skin care. At times the “party” is a one-day event promoted on Facebook.

6. Global market planning - “For the smaller company, this trend may emphasize the need to establish or strengthen export relationships so that it too may market on a worldwide basis. For many larger companies, it points to a day when the United States may be merely a domestic division within the worldwide corporation,” wrote Louth. Even CCRCs are not immune to globalization. The smartest ones are looking at what innovative, successful ideas are being implemented around the world, and then applying those learnings closer to home.

Read McKinsey’s archive feature: http://bit.ly/1kLELdB

The piece got a few of us flashing back, as you can see in this exchange with George Harben, of Prince William County Economic Development.

tweet exchange

 

Then George won the internet with the video he shared:

What do you think of the 6 marketing changes ID’d by McKinsey in 1966? Do they resonate with your challenges today? Please share your insights below.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Is that All You Blighters Can Do?

July 14th, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

Words! Words! Words! I’m so sick of words! 
I get words all day through;
First from him, now from you! 
Is that all you blighters can do? 

My teenage daughter and I watched the wonderful musical My Fair Lady this weekend. The Lerner & Loewe song “Show Me” seemed to perfectly capture the sentiment of last week’s top mature marketing links.

There’s Freddie, full of best intentions, desperately trying to connect with Eliza through passionate prose. There’s Eliza, tired of talking. If the movie were made today, she’d likely respond with Elvis’ “A Little Less Conversation (a lot more action).” Instead Eliza demands: “don’t waste my time, show me!”

Have mature marketers been too worried about the words, words, words they use? The items that got the most shares, clicks and comments last week had to do with the language of aging.

1. MOST SHARED: ”Updating the Language of Aging,” an article by LeadingAge’s Jane Sherwin about why language is so important in the senior living industry.  Sherwin shows how leading providers are not just picking words that don’t offend but are choosing those that will uplift and empower.

Michelle Seitzer of SeniorsForLiving summed it up when she shared the link:

updating-language-of-aging-tweet

Can words change the world? Read the piece at http://bit.ly/1mwDomu.

2. MOST COMMENTED: “Banana-fana Fo-senior …The Name Game and 50+ Marketing.”

This post on this blog generated some great discussion. We shared the results of two surveys related to the language of aging — namely, which words are loathed and which are liked. (No age-related labels seem to really be loved.)

Deb Unger is definitely in the show me camp. She wrote on the blog:

“Don’t market to my age. If you do you are in essence telling me what I should like or use based on my age. Market to a person instead and let me decide if it’s for me regardless of my age.”

Ronni Bennett, elderblogger, journalist and source of one of the two polls, countered:

“I don’t agree that descriptive words for old people shouldn’t refer to their age. There are a zillion reasons stories, reports and advertising need to target by age – sometimes for medications or for over-the-counter products (I, at 73, don’t need acne cream and it’s a waste of advertisers’ money to include me) and any reporter would be negligent to not declare teen, young adult, elder, etc. when they don’t have an age to report.”

The conversation’s just begun. Add your two cents here: http://bit.ly/1oVuRtA

3. Also of note:  No matter what marketers choose to call older adults, we can connect by understanding the stress they’re under and showing them we have solutions. NPR Health had a fine series of reports on stress last week.

What stresses older adults? Health problems are the dominant concern for seniors, while money is tops for baby boomers.

Table - Reasons for Stress by age group - NPR, Robert Wood Johnson, Harvard Health

The study was conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. Read more here: http://n.pr/1jHUM9q

 

My solution to stress? Curling up on the couch with my kids and a good movie. And singing along with Eliza as she uses words to change her world.

Banana-fana Fo-senior … The 50+ Marketing Name Game

July 9th, 2014 Posted by Erin Read

leslie nielsen - don't call me shirley* A new ecommerce site debates, do we create a category for 40+ products or for aging needs or for more complicated prescriptions?
* A senior living community wants to ban the word senior from brochures.
* A 55+ housing builder wants to strike the word retirement from its website.

Across industries, marketers wonder … is any word safe for 50+ marketing anymore?

(Walking) Sticks & (Rolling) Stones

While Creating Results has addressed the “language of aging” on this blog before, the issue is not going away. And rightly so.

Today’s 50+ers are different than those of the same age in the 1970s. The industries that serve them are different, most notably in senior living where there has been a huge shift from a culture where older equaled frail patient to one where older now equals vibrant community member.

Why were marketers surprised that today’s older adults began challenging the words used to depict (and at restrict) them? The Silent Generation (born 1925-1942) is the same one that led the fight for women’s rights, civil rights, and gay rights. They didn’t do that without kicking several words to the curb. Then there are the rarely-silent Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964). As they clock more time on the planet, they’re calling a time-out on limiting words like cane or retirement, opting for positive-skewing walking stick and encore, instead.

As perceptions change, so does language. And as language changes, so can perceptions.

As Jane Sherwin wrote in an excellent piece for LeadingAge Magazine last month,

“It’s more than the changing population that is driving this new awareness of language, according to Karen Schoeneman … a consultant on culture change. She says that as early as the 1980s there was a growing interest in changing a culture that represented patients as objects through its institutionalized terminology.

‘You can’t just use words, you have to change your outlook as well,’ says Schoeneman. ‘You have to change your culture to more of a community, you have to wake up to how you are treating each other. It’s gradual, a journey. Change in culture and words are almost simultaneous.’”

This is why when senior living leader North Hill embarked on a multi-million dollar campus transformation several years ago, one of their first acts was a training and discussion series about words. They built up their culture before tearing down buildings.

You’ll find the LeadingAge piece and some excellent resources here: http://bit.ly/1mwDomu.

The Words We Love … and Loathe

Two new surveys may offer guidance for this 50+ marketing name game.

1) Ina Jaffe is the aging reporter for NPR. After taking on this beat, she quickly came up against the language issue. When someone put a headline of “Elderly” on a profile of a 71-year-old midwife, “Listeners were furious,” she said.“Maybe once upon a time, ‘elderly’ referred to a particular stage in life, but now people think … it means you’re ailing and you’re frail.”

This prompted NPR to do a survey of its own. “Older adult” emerged the dubious winner — it’s liked by 43% of respondents; nearly 1/3 liked “elder” and nearly 1/3 liked “senior”… but not if paired with the word “citizen.”

As Jaffe reported yesterday, “The category of dislikes had the most enthusiasm. There were about three and a half times more votes cast for terms that didn’t like than for terms that they liked. And I can sum up the overall response by saying that they disliked pretty much everything.”

It wasn’t the obviously offensive terms like “geezer.” Many aging industry-promoted phrases like “positive aging” are disliked as well.

You’ll find the NPR results at http://n.pr/1oFkwCa.

2) The fact that Ronni Bennett calls herself an “elderblogger” and frequently posts as “Cranky Old Lady” should give you a sense of her personality. In May she decided to get a sense of her readers’ preferences for aging language.

Like Jaffe, Bennett found that people are very definite about words they DON’T like, but can’t really say what they DO like. Note that some words showed up in both the yes and no columns:

Table - names to use for older adults. TImeGoesBy poll, May 2014

Bennett doesn’t pull punches, and she has little patience for those who do.

“The cutesy-poo names and descriptions like golden ager, third ager, oldster and Portland, Oregon’s transit designation of ‘honored citizen’ are embarrassingly patronizing. In American English, no other age group but old people are singled out for disrespect in this manner.”

You’ll find Bennett’s results here: http://bit.ly/1mGkFqc. (For more insights, be sure to read the comments while you’re there.)

Ageless Marketing vs. Age-Specific Markets

When we last blogged about aging language, Marilynn Larkin shared this comment:

“How about ‘people’? ‘Customers’? ‘Members’? The longer I work with companies that try to market to boomers, seniors, whatever–the more convinced I am that a demographic –age– is NOT a market. “

That post was almost exactly one year ago. I’d love to hear from readers — has your language changed in this past year? After these recent surveys, will it change in the next?

Or maybe I’m really asking, can 50+ marketing have it both ways: can we find ageless language that connects with consumers segmented by age?

Mature Marketing Links of the (two) Week – “Unexpected Stories,” New 65+ Data

July 7th, 2014 Posted by Creating Results

san-fermin-pamplona-running-bullsToday begins the festival of San Fermin in Pamplona, Spain, in which small groups of bulls are let loose in the streets while white-clothed runners try to stay ahead of, on top of, or pretty much anywhere but under the bulls’ hooves.

It started out as a boring thing – a way to get the animals from the corral to the bullring. Then runners unexpectedly began joining the journey to the ring and now … The story of Pamplona and the running of the bulls has been memorialized by Hemingway and captures worldwide attention each year.

This past week, our top mature marketing content item was all about the unexpected. Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer for MarketingProfs and fantastic source of marketing insights, told blog readers that the key to “Breaking Out of Boring” was to “Tell Unexpected Stories.”

It was by far the most re-tweeted, favorited and clicked item on Creating Results’ social networks these past weeks.

Many brands wish they could break out of boring, but they believe they don’t have the flash of major consumer products or they operate in highly-regulated industries. Ann says LinkedIn “has become the poster child for a staid brand evolving its brand by telling unexpected stories.”

How does LinkedIn do it? Here are her three take-aways:

1) Tap into broad, universal themes. Ann’s example was of a musician’s story that tapped into the idea of ambition. For senior living, there are many aspirational ideas that elders relate to — choose the ones that help them imagine a better quality of life in your community.

2) Put the customer at the story’s center. As Ann writes, “Paradoxically, your “story” is not about you—it’s about what you do for others.”

Personally, I see this as the no-bull clause (pun intended). It is especially important for marketing to baby boomers. They’re not the me-generation the media portrays them as, but they won’t buy unless they know what you’ll do for them. Sharing the customer’s story (and therefore yours) also is more authentic. Remember: boomers were the first generation to be mass-marketed to; they can smell a phony a mile away.

3) Have a kick-ass call to action. 

What makes a call to action kick-ass? Click here to read Ann’s post and find out.

 

A few more attention-getting / attention-worthy items: 

* A new report from the US Census Bureau reveals interesting trends among Americans age 65+, and NextAvenue summarizes some highlights: http://bit.ly/1j8kvXS

- For instance, while labor force participation by men over 65 years old has dropped “precipitously” since 1950, participation by women of the same age has increased.

- From 2000 to 2010, the 65+ population grew by 15.1 percent overall. Where will you find older adults? Try Florida, the state with the highest percentage of residents 65 and over (17.3 percent). West Virginia and Maine rank #2 and #3 for highest percentage of 65+ers. The states with the lowest: Alaska (7.7 percent), followed by Utah and Texas.

- Social Security remains a critical source of income for older adults, especially the poorest Americans, as the chart below illustrates.

social-security-americans-over-65.censusbureau

* From the blog “vaults”: 10 practical PR tips for developers of 55+ and senior living communities: http://bit.ly/1qbkykx

* A look at DC’s newest metro line, the “colossal” expectations for it, and how it could shape the future of the American suburb: http://bit.ly/1qDAlLe

RELATED: A scholar is quoted in the article as saying “That’s where the market wants to be: in these walkable, urban locations.” Creating Results’ Todd Harff took a look at a critical part of that market — older adults — in last year’s post What Do Baby Boomers Want In a Home?

* Steve Farnsworth (@Steveology): Old school marketing yells and sells. Content marketing says, “I might have a solution that can help you.”

 Could Creating Results have a solution to help you and your colleagues achieve your goals? Check out our content — new case studies! — for some ideas and inspiration, then give us a call at 888-205-8899.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Landing Page Tips & “Free” ROI

June 23rd, 2014 Posted by Beth Mickey

Happy Monday!  It’s hard to believe that June is coming to a close, where did the time go?!  Let’s jump right into the mature marketing news that had people talking this past week.  Have something to share?  We’d love to see it in our comment section.

MOST CLICKED: As more and more mature consumers flock to online avenues for gathering information about your brand and moving themselves father down the purchase funnel, having a sound landing page strategy is critical. First and foremost, your landing page should serve as a vehicle for lead capture. Ed Kedzierski recently shared his tips for creating great landing page forms:

*Avoid lengthy fields: Keep it simple as long forms can be a huge turn off.  Rule of thumb: if you aren’t going to use the information don’t ask for it.

*Adjust the styling of your form: Make your form appear even shorter—less is more when it comes to driving completions.

*Don’t Submit: Try other wording on the button to capture information that more closely relates to the action and drives higher conversions.

*Eliminate Fear: We found in our Social, Silver Surfer research that privacy concerns run high, especially among boomers and beyond.  You’re capturing personal information, put people at ease by including your privacy policy and reconfirming a safe submission.

Read the full article here.

Related: Learn about Creating Results’ digital initiatives and discover how we can help you maximize your ROI.  Visit our website.

MOST SHARED:

Free ROI  In an age where everyone is looking to stand out, incentives are typically a go-to for quickly driving prospect interest and action. Marketing Profs recently shared an article regarding free offers and how you can measure effectiveness.

The reality is that free is never free for the marketer. There’s always an expense that has to be paid, even if it’s not paid by the customer. Moreover, that cost is often higher than marketer anticipates.

The article explored a variety of “free” incentives, including product and content, along with benefits to utilizing each.  At the end of the day, as marketers it is our job to evaluate potential incentives we want to include and ensure it is not only worth the cost but relevant to our brand.

Read the full post.


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