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Happy Monday! We saw a lot of shares and clicks of mature marketing news last week – here is just an overview of some of the top pieces that drove interest.  Have something to share about these or other mature marketing articles?  Please be sure to share in the comments below.

MOST SHARED

When acting on data captured through prospect engagement, we like share with our mature marketing clients the mantra – “close but not creepy”. The Wall Street Journal recently ran an article regarding a company that provides the technology to follow your prospect’s movements through how they access Wi-Fi from their phones.  The company accesses data captured through sensors that track Wi-Fi signal emissions , allowing for the creation and promotion of content and offers based on individual habits.

“Instead of offering a general promotion that may or may not hit a nerve, we can promote specifically to the customer’s taste,” says Mr. Zhang. He recently emblazoned workout tank-tops with his restaurant’s logo, based on the data about his customers’ gym visits.

The idea of tracking (and using) this information is creating a lot of conversations regarding just what is that “close by not creepy” line in the sand.  Regardless of the side you fall on it certainly is a topic that will make you pause before turning your Wi-Fi on when in public. Read the full story here.

Related: Smartphone and tablet usage by the numbers

MOST CLICKED

By far the article that had the most people talking was a roundtable regarding native advertising.  The article based on the discussion was shared by CPC Strategy Blog, featured insights from 18 industry experts on a topic that is creating a lot of buzz and interest.  Just what is native advertising? Here are some quotes straight from the experts contributing to the roundtable. Read the full article here.

Scott Reese of blurbIQ Inc:

Native advertising is a way for advertisers to produce, edit, and curate content that supports their brand and a publisher’s quality standards and provides information relevant to users’ interests.

Diana LaGattutta of NativeX:

We define native advertising as advertising that is contextual and complementary to the content in which it is placed. Not above, below, or beside, it becomes part of the user experience and often unique to the viewer or user.

Ari Jacoby of Solve Media:

Done correctly, native advertising symbolizes a new ability to give value back to consumers in a format that is in-the-flow of a user’s experience.

 

Do you use native marketing as a tactic for positioning your brand? How do you measure success?  We’d love to hear your thoughts, please share in the comment box below.

About The Author

Beth Mickey

With more than 15 years of marketing experience, Beth serves as Client Services Director for Creating Results. As an expert in e-engagement, Beth applies her experience in strategic planning and execution of email and online marketing efforts for her clients to identify opportunities to leverage online and offline marketing avenues as part of an integrated marketing approach. Her experience serving both in a client and agency capacity helps her gain an understanding for her client’s needs and goals to maximize program performance and return on investment.

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