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Greetings! On this day 120 years ago, American author James Thurber was born. Perhaps best known for “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” and wry dog cartoons, Thurber mastered the “modern” communications art of pairing an image with a punchline long before the .gif was born.

James Thurber - doesn't know anything except facts

The facts for today are simple: it’s Monday, so this is the Monday round-up of those items that got the most attention from mature marketing pros on various social platforms.

1. MOST SHARED: The Legacy Project has launched its 15th annual “Listen to a Life” essay contest, with entries accepted through March 31, 2015. To enter the Listen to a Life Contest, a person 8-18 years old interviews someone older than 50 years, then writes a 300-word essay based on that chat.

I love two  things about this project.

1) The interview subject cannot be a parent, though it may be a grandparent. What a lovely way to connect generations beyond family ties!

2) The site offers suggested questions for Life Interviews. Wouldn’t this be a wonderful thing to pass around the holiday table, encouraging all ages to connect on a deeper level?

Yup, I’m schmaltzy and proud of it.

Get the Contest Rules and other details: http://bit.ly/1ASIfnz

 

2. MOST CLICKED: A little “native content” (editorial supplied to Forbes by advertiser Northwestern Mutual) got the most clicks last week, a piece on why Baby Boomers are “graduating” to college towns.

“Retiring to or near a college campus may not be the obvious choice for many people; but as the Snyders discovered, college towns typically offer other important advantages besides access to classes and cultural events. For one, many have world-class teaching hospitals that draw top medical talent. College towns with strong, diverse economies also may offer full- and part-time job opportunities for retirees who aren’t ready to fully exit the work scene. And as the Snyders learned, housing prices in college towns like Asheville can be surprisingly affordable.

Many colleges and universities have linked up with private developers to build residential communities specifically designed to attract retirees. These can take a number of forms, ranging from luxury golf course housing and attractive condos to continuing-care retirement communities with apartment-style living and access to health care facilities.”

We noted in our original tweet that our client Traditions of America is a prime example of this trend. Baby boomers retiring to State College and Pittsburgh are very motivated by the influence of and access to higher education in those cities. The Creating Results team references the college-town appeal wherever appropriate in Traditions’ marketing. For example this page on their website appears to hit the same positive points about college-town retirement that the Forbes item did!

Traditions of America - college town - mature marketing
Please share your examples of mature marketing that reflects the draw of college towns in the comments section, below.

Read the article: http://onforb.es/12E0i4L

 

3. Also of note:

* What marketers should do about the growth in technology adoption by older adults: http://bit.ly/1qjxv0r

* Silent Generation seniors (born 1925-1942) win the “life lottery” as the richest age group in the United States, Bloomberg reports. So why aren’t economists happy about that? http://bloom.bg/1Ippqx5Chart - Median family net worth by age group

Those are the facts for this Monday! What didn’t we know? I hope you’ll share your insights below.

About The Author

Erin Read

Erin Read spearheads integrated and digital marketing programs for organizations targeting mature consumers. She writes, researches and speaks about marketing to baby boomers and seniors. Erin has addressed local, regional, international conferences on generational marketing. She is the co-author of three national studies/eBooks (Photo Finish; Social, Silver Surfers 2010 & 2013) and the principal blogger for Mature Marketing Matters.

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