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5_9_16_Nostalgia

Happy Monday!

This week our mature marketing recap focuses on how shared space is shaping (or re-shaping) multi-housing and the impact of boomer nostalgia on tourism. But these certainly weren’t the only articles sparking conversation and ideas over the last week. We’d love to know what inspired you, so be sure to share within our comments section.

ROY_Historic-Route-66-Sign_9405 10-18-50MOST SHARED: As a kid I remember numerous trips to my grandparent’s house that included lots of time driving up and down Route 66. I will admit that I’m sure my mom’s memories of those trips include a lot of comments including “are we there yet?,” “I want that toy” and others that don’t necessarily elicit positive memories of the route.

A recent Boston Globe article shared that many of the long run-down or closed landmarks along this iconic route are actually reopening and helping to reinvigorate tourism.

Now these structures — many of them long vacant — are reopening as trendy hotels, restaurants, microbreweries and bars along a part of Route 66 through Albuquerque called EDo, or East Downtown, that fill with patrons far too young to remember the onetime allure of the highway as a frontier of the freedom of the open road.

For boomers and seniors, this means a way for them to even recreate memories with their family members, many of whom didn’t have an opportunity to experience before. And it works — people are flocking to destinations that provide a “throw-back” experience that allows them to relive experiences from their youth that shaped who they are.

For those within senior living, why not try creating a nostalgic experience for your residents within your community. In a former life I worked for a museum. The most popular exhibit we ever hosted was one that showcased popular toys from throughout the years. I loved hearing stories how what these items meant to our guests. Seek out partners you can invite to your community that offer experiential trips down memory lane.

Read the full article.

MOST CLICKED: Many boomers are exploring ways they can say goodbye to home ownership and the maintenance that comes along with it. The same goes for businesses — they are constantly seeing solutions for how to leverage the space they need for their offerings while balancing the ongoing rise in costs. The answer for many has been renting. Many developers have found they need to be creative with their solutions to these concerns.

A recent article in Multi-Housing News detailed how some are approaching shared space as 1 solution to the need at hand.

  1. Shared housing: Luxury homes offer private bedroom spaces with shared common rooms where residents determine how to split the total cost of rent.
  2. Shared business suites: To make business travel easier, spaces include a bank of private guest rooms with shared meeting and dining spaces to provide a higher level of flexibility than hotels can offer.
  3. Shared creative space: A live/work environment designed to inspire creative-types includes areas to display and sell artwork.
  4. Shared sustainability: I call this a choose your own adventure, as the groups leasing the space are able to determine how they use the shared areas.
  5. Shared office: Small shops are able to share the space and costs of an office in flexible work spaces.

Learn more.

WORTH REPEATING:

Be sure to read Amanda Comb’s blog post where she shares senior living and real estate opportunities she gained during her attendance at the HeroConf 2016, the largest PPC event/conference. In the post she notes everything from the benefits of Bing to Google updates you need to know.

Read the post here.

 

 

 

About The Author

Beth Mickey

With more than 15 years of marketing experience, Beth serves as Client Services Director for Creating Results. As an expert in e-engagement, Beth applies her experience in strategic planning and execution of email and online marketing efforts for her clients to identify opportunities to leverage online and offline marketing avenues as part of an integrated marketing approach. Her experience serving both in a client and agency capacity helps her gain an understanding for her client’s needs and goals to maximize program performance and return on investment.

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