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Posts By Erin Read

Today's round-up of top posts for marketing to older adults is like a "choose your own adventure" novel.

Feeling business-like? Check out the insights into marketing preferences via MarketingSherpa. Curious about mortality? The CDC's stats on centenarians should interest you. Ready for a good cry? Grab your hankie and listen to Maurice Sendak's words of wisdom.

MOST CLICKED: How do Baby Boomers want to discover and then learn more about products? And how do their preferences differ from that other big cohort, the Millennials?

Baby boomer using cell phone

Happy Leap Day! The calendar is generously giving us a few extra hours -- use them to catch up on work, for folly, for whatever.

In that spirit, we'll try to give you a little something extra in this weekly round-up of the links that rose to the top with boomer and senior marketing pros in recent days.

MOST SHARED: Creating Results' Director of Media Strategies has a talent for making complex media changes more easily understood ... and acted upon.

I love it when my passions align.

1. MOST CLICKED: Is the wine industry forecast becoming cloudy, as "oenophile boomers" are replaced by frugal Millennials?

That's what the Silicon Valley Bank predicts in its annual State of the Wine Industry report. (How am I not a subscriber?) Beverage World reports that the bank is placing the blame squarely on the younger generation.

"While demand for premium wine will increase this year, there are clouds on the horizon that should be considered. We believe total and per capita wine consumption in the U.S. will drop for the first time in more than 20 years due to emerging generational shifts in consumption patterns that we see accelerating in the near term," says Rob McMillan, founder of Silicon Valley Bank's Wine Division and author of the report.

Many of our readers may have included fitness in their 2016 New Years Resolutions. But what about "brain fitness," that new and growing industry based on the concept that we can rewire and strengthen our neural pathways as we age?

This week's round-up of mature marketing articles and resources shares recent brain fitness news. The post also addresses news itself -- specifically, newspapers, that older and shrinking industry based on the concept of delivering local topics on printed sheets of paper. We wrap it all up with a quote timely for today, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Read on!

1. MOST SHARED: Per Alvaro Fernandez, chief executive of SharpBrains, a market research firm SharpBrains, "worldwide revenues of the brain fitness industry surged to more than $1 billion in 2012 from $200 million in 2005 and are expected to surpass $6 billion by 2020."

This post features two quick hits relevant to those marketing to 55 plus consumers. You'll also quickly note a theme ... Read on for why!

Betting on Brands

MarketingSherpa last year conducted an online-only survey in which they looked at who follows brands on social media. Key findings included:

"The older generations were also less likely to follow brands. Only 35% of 55-64 year olds and 35% of participants 65 years and older followed brands on social media, compared to 95% of 18-34 year olds, 92% of 35-44 year olds and 85% of 45-54 year olds."

This was pretty much in line with Creating Results' ongoing studies of Social, Silver Surfers. Our multi-year research into the preferences of older adults shows a great resistance to becoming a social follower.

Happy New Year! Like many, our office went into stealth mode during the last weeks of 2015, as our team enjoyed the holidays with family and friends. Yet the Internet doesn't sleep ...

Here are a few items that caught the attention of 50+ marketing pros during recent weeks:

1. MOST CLICKED: The Silver Group calls this "a stunning video shows ageism is alive and well," and we agree. Australia's Apia Insurance staged a stunt -- really a social experiment -- with a group of dynamic 50+ers and a separate group of young advertisers.

Good morning! Each Monday we recap the top activity on our social channels the previous week -- which links / resources got the most clicks, likes, shares, etc. on Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn and Facebook. Here are three items that caught the attention of mature marketing professionals.

1. MOST SHARED: Does it "pay to be gray"? Is there a "silver lining" to recent data showing the U.S. middle class is disappearing?

The Pew Research Center has released new study that shows that middle class Americans are "falling behind relative to upper income adults," as co-author Richard Fry states. However, "The biggest winners since 1971 are people 65 and older."

Last Monday we started the week on a note of laughter, with jokes from and about outgoing LeadingAge President Larry Minnix. This Monday we find it hard to smile, as news reports are filled with tragedies happening around our globe. Then a friend shared the following quote, and it seemed appropriate to pass it on:

"Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Paris, Kenya, Lebanon, Syria ... May light and love be theirs. Here is this week's round-up of top links for marketing to baby boomers and seniors.

1. MOST CLICKED: "More 50+ baby boomers and seniors own digital devices than ever. What does it mean for your marketing?"

Older person with tablet device

The Pew Research Center has released a new study, "Technology Device Ownership: 2015," which contains some actionable data for those marketing to baby boomers and seniors. In short, more adults -- including those over the age of 50 -- own smartphones and tablets than ever before. And while nearly three times as many 18-29 year old Millennials as 65+ers own a smartphone, ownership of tablets doesn't show the same age gap.

Here are some key statistics and some action items for your boomers / seniors marketing program.

Typically this Monday round-up of top 50+ marketing links are organized by most clicked, most shared, most commented ... Today we'll take a slightly different tack as there were several topics that seemed to grab the attention of mature marketing pros over the past week.

LEADING ... LeadingAge, that is!

LeadingAge, the association representing 6,000 non-profit senior living communities and others providing services to the aging, held its annual meeting in Boston from November 1-4. Speakers shared many ideas on how to lead -- as an organization, as a manager, as a marketer.

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