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More people of all ages are watching / sharing online videos than ever before.

And studies show video marketing has power to motivate consumers – including Baby Boomers and Seniors – to act or buy.

Yet many senior providers don’t know how to integrate video into their marketing.

Over the next month, Jessica Ruhle and I will be sharing best practices for creating both product and lifestyle videos to strategically position senior-serving organizations. We’re honored to have been invited to speak to the topic at both the LeadingAge Massachusetts and LeadingAge Pennsylvania conferences.

Why are continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs), 55+ housing or any organizations focused on older adults considering video at all? Is it because executives are demanding it? Because they see everyone doing it?

Happy Monday! This week our mature marketing recap focuses on how shared space is shaping (or re-shaping) multi-housing and the impact of boomer nostalgia on tourism. But these certainly weren't the only articles sparking conversation and ideas over the last week. We'd love to know what inspired you, so be sure to share within our comments section. MOST SHARED: As…

I have a long-lasting love of pigs.

A few things reminded me of this affection last week.

One, a discussion with my college-bound teens about what should or should not go with them to university. She wants to bring her Harry Potter wand. I stopped protesting after recalling that I headed off to "adulthood" with three stuffed pigs, including one who snorted loudly when stepped on in the middle of the night. (My roommates loved me.)

Two, this tweet from our Director of Business Development, Beth Spohn:

Way back in 2010 Creating Results asked recent, mature movers what frustrated them about housing websites.

#1 with a bullet? "Don't say price."

We asked the question of hundreds of Social, Silver Surfers because we wanted data to back up our recommendations to senior living providers. Our team kept saying "you need to talk online about your pricing" and their teams kept saying "no!"

Now that recommendation carries even more weight, thanks to the team at Lead InSite.

Each week we share mature marketing insights and articles that capture the eye and create conversation. Let's take a look at those pieces that did just that over the last 7 days.

MOST SHARED: "Let's get back to the basics" is a phrase that I heard repeatedly when studying what would become my passion and profession (and something I share with clients even today when discussing how best to position their communities and offerings).

A recent article served as a great reminder that while marketers must work harder to keep up with the ever changing times, that the overall psychology of marketing hasn't changed at all ...

Today's roundup has a senior living emphasis -- we touch on the trend of people entering senior living at an older age and the need for engaging the teams that serve them. BONUS non-senior-living item at the bottom of the post!

MOST CLICKED: Models for senior healthcare must evolve to respond to the increasing number of people entering senior living at older ages.

This was a key point of discussion at the Spring Investment Forum of the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and Care (NIC), and it was the item that most caught the attention of 50+ marketing pros last week.

There is a new trend in the housing market within the 50-and-over age demographic: Rentals.

Per a new study, conducted by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, there is a rising number of middle-aged home renters.

According to the report, America’s Rental Housing, “recent declines in homeownership rates have lifted the number of middle-aged renters.” In fact, over the last decade, the number households occupied by middle-aged renters increased from 10 million to 15 million. As a result, the 50-and-over demographic accounted for over half of renter growth from 2005 through the third quarter of 2015.

A day late, but not a dollar short, this week's links reveal a need to be nimble. All industries must adjust to the changing and growing needs and expectations of an aging population.

We look at both ends of the financial spectrum here — from those who can afford to look for, and demand, options to fit their busy lifestyles, to those who are simply trying to survive without a pension or retirement funds.

MOST CLICKED: In the senior housing market, builders are increasingly looking at the preferences of the younger buyer.

I love it when my passions align.

1. MOST CLICKED: Is the wine industry forecast becoming cloudy, as "oenophile boomers" are replaced by frugal Millennials?

That's what the Silicon Valley Bank predicts in its annual State of the Wine Industry report. (How am I not a subscriber?) Beverage World reports that the bank is placing the blame squarely on the younger generation.

"While demand for premium wine will increase this year, there are clouds on the horizon that should be considered. We believe total and per capita wine consumption in the U.S. will drop for the first time in more than 20 years due to emerging generational shifts in consumption patterns that we see accelerating in the near term," says Rob McMillan, founder of Silicon Valley Bank's Wine Division and author of the report.

Baby Boomers and seniors are seeking a new lifestyle, not just a new home in a new community. Whether they plan to downsize, upsize or rightsize, at the end of the day what they are really seeking is a new home and new community which enhances their lives.

Recently I spoke at the International Builders Show. Conversations with attendees and attending others’ sessions reinforced the idea that adults aged 55 or better want out of their current homes where they have lived for 10, 20, 30 years or more. But what do they want to get into?

You don’t need to watch more than one day of HGTV to understand that everyone wants open concept, but these buyers also want lower-maintenance homes (inside and out thank-you) with greater function. More often than not 55-plus homebuyers stay relatively close to their current neighborhood but proximity to conveniences also is of prime importance.

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