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Category Archives Mature Consumers

4_3_17

Happy Monday! Each week we explore the mature marketing news that received the most interest and clicks the previous week. This week is all about mobile marketing.

First, we'll explore mobile usage among boomers and seniors by way of a report from Edison Research, and then we'll take a look at mobile marketing as it relates to what MarketingSherpa found were the most disliked advertising avenues.

MOST SHARED

This past week I was thrilled to join the Mid-Atlantic 55+ Housing Council to share opportunities and insights for marketing 55+ communities to the mature consumer. I always learn so much when I join the council, and this event was no exception.

3-13-17_Senior-Staffing

With snow bearing down on the East Coast of the United States, we stay warm with a recap of last week's top links for mature marketing professionals.

MOST CLICKED: Ziegler Hotline Polls Find Labor Shortages a Hot Topic

Our friends at Ziegler Investment Banking report that senior living CFOs are feeling the pressure of staffing shortages.

For the past decade, Ziegler has gathered insights from senior living CFOs through CFO HotlineSM surveys on a variety of topics. In their February "Z-News," Ziegler recapped some of those findings. Our audience seemed particularly interested in the takeaways about labor shortages.

2_20_17

Here is the roundup of the most engaging posts from the previous week.

MOST CLICKED: Demographic Projections and the Implications that Affects our Economy

Jo Ann Jenkins, CEO of AARP, wrote an thoughtful article on our extended lifespans and the implications our longevity will have on our economic and social structure.

Ms. Jenkins, in a post published on LinkedIn, notes that since longer lives create multiple questions, like paying for pensions and medical care, a change in our views on aging is needed. As a society, Jenkins feels we need to focus on the benefits of an extended life starting now.

Here are a few more intriguing facts from the article to ponder:

1_23_17a

"Little Things Can Mean A Lot."

Each Monday our team recaps a few of the "little things" that meant a lot to our subscribers and followers over the past week. Articles that inspired, stats that answered a burning question, and more.

Taken together week-after-week, these LITTLE things can have a BIG impact on integrated marketing programs aimed at baby boomers and seniors.

MOST CLICKED: A tie!

Lois Bowers discovers in senior living marketing, little (positive) things mean a lot. http://bit.ly/2k9RHRG

Lois is senior editor at McKnight's Senior Living, and she recently spent a few days at a senior community, trying to view it as a future resident might.

2016_inreview2

Another year gone by, and boy was it a doosy! Against the backdrop of dramatic political change and cultural shifting, our industry remained homed in on issues relevant to how the mature market is evolving.

Read on for the hot topics Creating Results explored in 2016, including: embracing novel approaches to marketing to seniors, the importance of visual storytelling, an increase in renting among older adults, surprising similarities among generational preferences in communities, and changes to Google advertising.

collaboration-illustration

“I'm about to just give you all of my money And all I'm asking, hey, is a little respect” (Otis Redding in 1965. Made popular by Aretha Franklin in 1967.)

Be honest.

Looking at all of your marketing initiatives, is your team truly respecting people?

Mature consumers are experienced buyers and they want to give someone a whole lot of money. Since Baby Boomers and seniors value respect, make emotional decisions and hate BS, they do business with organizations that they trust and feel good about.

If you want their money, challenge your organization to be more personal and demonstrate R-E-S-P-E-C-T in every aspect of your 2017 Marketing Plan.

photography_parti

Who would have guessed 25 years ago that anyone (even a 5-year-old!) could take — and instantly share — great photos using a device that's about the size of a wallet?

The visual world changed dramatically in the 1990s with the invention of a chip making that possible. By 2003 more camera phones were sold worldwide than stand-alone digital cameras, and by 2006 half the world's mobile phones had a built-in camera.

Today, many organizations are still struggling to react to the challenges this paradigm shift in photography have created.

Looking ahead to 2017 it is critical not only to acknowledge — but to embrace and thoughtfully plan for — photography as a necessary investment. How?

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