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Archive for the ‘Retirement’ Category

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – All The Singular Ladies

Monday, November 10th, 2014

Insider knowledge for your Monday morning: Creating Results’ team member Sally O’Donnell LOVES Beyonce. So it is with respect for both dynamic young women that we drew inspiration for this week’s headline. Indeed, it was the singular situations of women (specifically, dynamic older women) that captured the bulk of attention and action on social media platforms last week.

Just what were the top links for those marketing to 50+ women and men? Read on.

1. MOST SHARED: 1 in 5 single, senior women in America lives in poverty, with less than $11,173 a year. This video from the National Senior Citizens Law Center presents, as the Center puts it, “the stories of four brave and honest women as they share the reality of growing old poor in America.”

You also can view the video above at http://bit.ly/1sojby4.

Older women are more likely to live alone than older men. And they’re far more likely to live in poverty. As the video notes, 1 in 5 seniors heading into retirement have no retirement savings at all. Mature marketing pros need to be aware of the many seniors who are struggling to pay bills, to eat, to pay for healthcare, to hold their heads up on a daily basis.

2. MOST CLICKED: Another video, but a very different group of older women … This song by Donnalou Stevens made us smile, and made our followers on Twitter and Facebook click through.

You also can view the video above at http://bit.ly/10N42Ag.

RELATED: “If you want a younger model, I wish you well, sweetpea. If you can’t see what it is you have, then you ain’t having me” — Donnalou could have been singing to many major advertisers! As we noted in this September blog post, older adults are unhappy with and frequently ignored by advertising: http://bit.ly/1ucWzGh

3. Also of note:

* Aging dads, running moms – How Skechers is appealing to baby boomers and more: http://buswk.co/1GFeSsN

* Nielsen summarizes new research by The Demand Institute that shows boomers are not going to head south in retirement, as other generations have been perceived to do. They’ll try to age-in-place, making home renovations and accommodations as needed/if possible. http://bit.ly/1stHDiM

Source: Nielsen Wire

Source: Nielsen Wire

Creating Results would be remiss if we didn’t note that the reasons to renovate also are reasons to look at 55+ active adult and senior living communities … where you wouldn’t be consigned to living a singular life …

* Why are we working later in life — because we want to or because we have to? A research fellow at the Sloan Center on Aging and Work shares insights: http://bit.ly/10N7M4P

* Finally, whether women or men, nearly 70% of older adults will NOT use any social media channels for holiday shopping: http://mwne.ws/1stIbFn

 

What singular insights can you draw from this latest group of links? Please share your thoughts in the comments section, below.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Social Media Marketing Failure

Monday, October 6th, 2014

October: changing leaves, carving pumpkins, discovering you’re half-way through the bag of candy you bought for Halloween … Time to drop the peanut butter cup and read on for the top mature marketing links for the first week of this new month.

1. MOST SHARED: The “Ten Commandments for Social Media Failure.” Want to avoid socnet #failures? Take a look at the the ten ways marketers guarantee such problems, as described by Tania Yuki of Shareablee. Yuki’s excellent list ranges from treating social media marketing “as a magical ATM” to not measuring results to focusing on the number of followers/fans over more meaningful numbers such as conversions.

Here’s one sure-fire way to fail that we see all-too-frequently in 50+ marketing. As Yuki writes:

“Delegate social media only to the young — and then don’t support them

After all, if you can eat a pizza, you can make a pizza, so it makes sense to give social media over to the digital natives. Any one of them will do. They grew up on Facebook so they will know how to market your 100-year-old brand without any training, guidelines, or strategy. A no-rules policy inspires creativity and honesty, leading to gems like this.

And if you can’t hand social over to a Millennial, you can just make it someone’s second job and see what happens. How much time could social media require, anyway? It’s not like there’s over a billion people on it or anything.”

We’ve seen clients greatly improve results after investing in social media training for ALL team members, or at a minimum all leadership team members. Education leads to early buy-in, ongoing enthusiasm and more effective storytelling that drives to business goals.

Read the article in iMedia Connection: http://bit.ly/1n9KOz8

2. MOST CLICKED: This interactive chart shows traditional TV viewing is trending down for cohorts, but slightly up for baby boomers and seniors (seen in a gradual up-and-to-the-right slope). http://bit.ly/1vH0skZ

Chart - active users top social platforms facebook instagram twitter

Source: TechCrunch

We included that chart in a post last week on TV viewing and older consumers. A related link also got a high number of click-throughs: it was to a November 2013 post with stats on the use of buzzed-about marketing channels such as Instagram and Snapchat (http://bit.ly/1mLbypj)

This led us to wonder if the age gap on Instagram was narrowing at all. Instagram’s user base has grown to about 200 million. (Compare to Pinterest at 70 million and Facebook at 1.37 billion registered users, per Craig Smith at Digital Marketing Ramblings.)

In March of 2014, eMarketer reported that 69% of Instagram users were between 18 and 44. They project that 200,000 65+ seniors will use the service this year vs. 20+ million 18-34 year olds. And by 2016, that number of senior uses will grow to 800,000 while the number of 18-34 year old users will grow to 24+ million.

So while Instagram shouldn’t be overlooked and the service does continue to grow, it wouldn’t be our first choice for marketing to baby boomers and seniors.

3. Also of note:

* Even though 53% of boomers plan to leave New York City on retirement, by 2035 1 in 5 residents will be over 65, via The Epoch Times: http://bit.ly/1yHdKU7

* 8 simple ways you can use old fashioned Marketing Tactics to build your email marketing list, by Lorraine Ball: http://bit.ly/1sZrzL7

(If we may be so bold to add a #9: check out this case study and call Creating Results.)

* Stats That Prove Content Marketing Increases Lead Generation, Sales, and ROI, via SmartBug Media: http://bit.ly/1EksdFZ

Laboring Baby Boomers

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

Yesterday, the United States celebrated Labor Day. According to the United State Department of Labor, “Labor Day … constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.” Each year, fewer of those workers are baby boomers, as millions of the cohort have retired in recent years. 

With the aging of baby boomers, we see three labor force trends.

Decline in labor force participation by people 55+

Between the fourth quarter of 2007 to the fourth quarter of 2013, about 5.5 million more people retired. Business Insider reported this as a 16% increase. Despite this, the publication notes, “the labor force participation rate for those 55 years of age and over has only been falling for the last year, whereas the total labor force participation rate has been falling for over five years.”

Chart - baby boomer labor force participation - Business Insider

Source: Business Insider / Matthew Boesler

USA Today reports:

About 76% of those leaving the workforce in 2013 last year represented people over age 55 who say they don’t want jobs, the Labor Department estimates.

“Arithmetically, the Boomers will keep pushing (participation) down done for another 15 years,” said Dean Maki, economist at investment bank Barclays.

Rising 55+ entrepreneurship

Many of the baby boomers who are “retiring” may actually be redefining employment by starting their own ventures. Their age group (born 1946-1964) has had the largest increase in entrepreneurial activity over the last decade, per the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. A 2011 study by Civic Ventures found that  25% of Americans ages 44 to 70 were interested in starting businesses or nonprofit ventures within 5 to 10 years.

Encore careers – a match made in economic heaven?

Boomers are also pursuing new jobs, whether full- or part-time, often called “encore careers.”women-wPlant

Non-profit organization Encore.org reports that boomer interest in encore careers rose 17% between 2011 and 2014.

“More than 25 million Americans 50 to 70 years old are eager to share their skills, passions and expertise in encore careers that address social needs, typically in education, health care, human services and the environment, according to a 2014 study by Encore.org and Penn Schoen Berland. Of this larger group, more than 4.5 million, or 6 percent, are already working for social impact. Another 21 million are ready to join them, nearly six in ten within the next five years.”

Why should boomers want to try a second act, a new chapter in employment? As we noted in a 2012 post called “Re-Thinking Retirement: 6 Lessons For Marketers,” “Work during retirement provides a paycheck … and much more.” 

Baby boomers pursue these encore careers for a mix of reasons, primary among them a sense of purpose. Meeting financial needs and/or earning enough to maintain their lifestyle are also important. 

 

Now that the Labor Day cookouts have ended, and we’re all back to work (sigh), marketers should consider what impact these trends will have on boomer lifestyle and purchase decisions. Then apply those insights to your marketing program. You’ll find your own labors become more effective.

RELATED:  Re-Thinking Retirement: 6 Lessons For Marketers

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Encore Jobs and Marketing Flashbacks

Monday, July 21st, 2014

Chart - living US veterans by age group

 

On this date in 1930, President Herbert Hoover established the Veterans Administration. There are an estimated 21,972,964 living US Veterans, and it’s a decidedly gray group — 72% are over the age of 50.

As we wrote on this blog back in 2009, senior veterans are educated, adaptable and everywhere. Since that post another half a million veterans entered the 65+ block, which means their health needs are have only increased.

(Does your organization’s marketing program consider the values and perspectives of elder veterans?)

Don’t want until November 11 to thank a Veteran. Do it today.

 

Now, on to the week’s top mature marketing links.

1. MOST SHARED: Roughly 9 million Americans over 44 are working in “encore” jobs, using skills and earning a living, reports the Chicago Tribune. Some do so by choice — this is how they want to spend their retirement. Others by necessity — they found themselves involuntarily retired.

“… 9% of the 100 million people [ages 44 to 70] work in encore jobs, according to a 2011 survey by Encore.org, a nonprofit organization, and the MetLife foundation. An additional 31 million would like to …

The share of older Americans in the workforce has risen sharply since the mid-1990s, and polls show millions of people plan to work in years that once were classified as retirement.”

Read the article: http://trib.in/WyunAu

RELATED: Un-Retiring Presidents

2. MOST CLICKED: McKinsey & Company recently posted an article from its archives — 1966, to be precise — that looked at the “changing face of marketing.” The analysis of six major trends struck a chord with me … and with Creating Results’ followers on Twitter who clicked through and responded.

Many of the changes identified by McKinsey consultant John D. Louth in 1966 continue to be strong forces in marketing today.

1. The dominance of the customer - Louth wrote that “the end users of almost every company’s products are shifting in makeup, location, and number at an ever-increasing rate. The significance of this to senior marketing executives is twofold: First, they cannot—indeed, they must not—assume that yesterday’s customers will be available tomorrow. Second, they had better be certain that they have adequate sources of market information.”

Todd Harff and I have stressed this point in a series of presentations to senior living associations this year. Pointing out the best practices of global brands such as Nordstrom and Marriott, we emphasize that continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) cannot base today’s selections and offerings on what residents who moved in 10 years ago like. Or even those who arrived 2 years ago. CCRCs must be thinking of what people who will move in 2 years from now want.

2. The spread of marketing research - “Beyond this value in reporting on historical and current conditions, however, I see a trend toward increased use of marketing research as a creative tool to help solve future management problems.” Well put, Mr. Louth!

3. The rise of the computer - “Generally speaking, I think it must be conceded that companies have dragged their feet in taking advantage of electronic data-processing analyses, online communications, and information-retrieval systems as tools to help make marketing more efficient.” The more things change …

4. Expanded use of test marketing - Louth notes that with rising costs of introducing new products and packaging and training salespeople, market tests can “narrow the odds of an error.”

5. Metamorphosis of field selling - Could Louth have imagined today’s network marketing? Every month I am invited to join or host a house party featuring baskets, jewelry, kitchen ware, natural skin care. At times the “party” is a one-day event promoted on Facebook.

6. Global market planning - “For the smaller company, this trend may emphasize the need to establish or strengthen export relationships so that it too may market on a worldwide basis. For many larger companies, it points to a day when the United States may be merely a domestic division within the worldwide corporation,” wrote Louth. Even CCRCs are not immune to globalization. The smartest ones are looking at what innovative, successful ideas are being implemented around the world, and then applying those learnings closer to home.

Read McKinsey’s archive feature: http://bit.ly/1kLELdB

The piece got a few of us flashing back, as you can see in this exchange with George Harben, of Prince William County Economic Development.

tweet exchange

 

Then George won the internet with the video he shared:

What do you think of the 6 marketing changes ID’d by McKinsey in 1966? Do they resonate with your challenges today? Please share your insights below.

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Tablets for Responsive Design, (un) Retirement

Monday, June 16th, 2014

Three bears, two speakers, and one exciting milestone. Let the round-up of top mature marketing links begin!

Older woman at North Hill senior living using iPad.

iPads in use at North Hill senior living.

1. MOST SHARED: Goldilocks and websites: Why designers should see tablets as “just right.”  http://bit.ly/T0Q8GQ In this post by Monetate, Nathan Richter suggests that tablets are the perfect device for designers to focus on when trying to improve user experience.

“Tablets, which continue to eat up market share, are not just ‘middle of the road’ options when it comes to design. They offer a ‘medium-sized’ view that might be ‘just right’ for all your digital touch points.”

Tablets are especially popular with baby boomers, which might explain why this tweet got so much attention last week. 38% of younger Boomers (ages 45-54) own one, along with 28% of older Boomers (ages 55-64) and 18% of 65+ seniors. As we wrote in April,

“Start thinking about, testing and perhaps re-designing your emails and website for better mobile experience. Because whether older people are using desktops, smartphones or tablets, they’re more connected than ever and their expectations are rising.”

RELATED:  Smartphone, Tablet Use by Age and Gender, and  Baby Boomers: Past, Present, Powerful (Future of Media)

2. MOST CLICKED: Look who’s speaking at the International Conference on Active Aging conference in Orlando! http://bit.ly/1p9bnR5 Todd Harff and I are thrilled to be part of an exciting new addition to what is always an exceptional conference — a Marketing Symposium on November 12. Boomer expert Dr. Alexis Abramson and RLTV’s Elliot Jacobson are the other speakers for the day.

3. Also of note

Fairing Way 55+ community groundbreaking

* Congratulations to client Fairing Way for breaking ground on their new 55+ community! Creating Results has have been privileged to hel

RELATED: Case study – direct marketing newsletterp Fairing Way drive leads, capture deposits and make their way towards this milestone.

* Ina Jaffe of NPR reports on a new study that finds nearly half of people surveyed who say they’re retired are working or have worked in the recent past. And nearly three quarters of baby boomers say they plan to stay on the job past retirement age.  Listen to the story: http://n.pr/1kShT0b

RELATED: Re-thinking Retirement – 6 Lessons for Marketers, and Working for a Life (Not A Living): How people who refuse to retire are changing 55+ communities

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Capturing Content, Continuing Careers

Monday, June 9th, 2014

Today is the birthdate of American composer Cole Porter, inspiring us to add a little musical flair to our weekly round-up of top mature marketing links.

You’re The Top: The tweet receiving the most clicks this week taught us that email continues to be a top marketing channel for reaching affluent consumers, especially older affluents. A Luxury Institute survey found more than twice as many people with incomes of $150,000 or more would choose email over text.

 Chart - affluents prefer email to text, a Luxury Institute survey shows

More data: http://bit.ly/1puyoyY

Anything Goes: What do you do if you’re a PR person and there’s just no news? Shift Communications’ Christopher S. Penn says if you don’t have information of your own to push out, be capturing it from other sources. Specifically,

* Capture with your smartphone’s camera every day

* Capture while reading (my own approach – you should see the index of mature marketing links I have for future content!)

* Capture other captures

Read the post: http://bit.ly/1kVOktp

Don’t Fence Me In: What do older adults want in retirement? Part time work. Full time work. Flexible schedules.

According to a new Merrill Lynch study, fewer and fewer want to actually retire in retirement, to stop working altogether. As was reported on NPR, “almost half the people who say they are retired are still working or have worked in the recent past. Nearly three quarters of baby boomers who are not yet retired say they plan to stay on the job past retirement age.”

Hear Ina Jaffe’s report: http://n.pr/1kShT0b

Read Creating Results’ past posts on retirement: http://knowledge.creatingresults.com/category/retirement/

 

Happy Monday! And, happy birthday, Cole Porter!

Mature Marketing Links of the Week: Technology & Boomer Migration

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Happy Monday! Here is a recap of the top mature marketing news and reports that had people talking.

MOST SHARED

A study released in early April entitled Older Adults and Technology Use  by the  Pew Research Center that had many people sharing last week.  The study, and associated article,  focuses not just on general boomer and senior technology usage, but how it varies by age bracket within the overall 65 and better population. In general, seniors overall adaption of technology continues to increase, especially among the younger, more affluent boomers.

Key take-aways:Mature Marketing Links of the Week- Senior Technology Usage

*  6 in 10 seniors are online: 59% of seniors are online and 77% have a cell phone, both increasing from similar studies conducted in 2012:

But despite these gains, seniors continue to lag behind younger Americans when it comes to tech adoption. And many seniors remain largely unattached from online and mobile life—41% do not use the internet at all, 53% do not have broadband access at home, and 23% do not use cell phones.

*  Younger, more educated seniors use internet at rates exceeding general population usage:  82% of seniors with an annual income of $75,000 or more go online, while just 39% of seniors earning less than $30,000  go online.

*  Hurdles to technology usage among older seniors includes physical challenges, difficulty in learning new technology and  overall skepticism.

Around two in five seniors indicate that they have a “physical or health condition that makes reading difficult or challenging” or a “disability, handicap, or chronic disease that prevents them from fully participating in many common daily activities”. This group is significantly less likely than seniors who do not face these physical challenges to go online (49% vs. 66%), to have broadband at home (38% vs. 53%), and to own most major digital devices.

*  Once seniors begin utilizing technology (and have a positive attitude about it) they make it a habit to use regularly.

The article goes on to detail social media usage among boomers and beyond, a topic that Creating Results has researched thoroughly within our Social, Silver Surfer research.

Click here for the full article. 

RELATED: Pew Report Shows Gains in Technology Adoption by Older People & Older Adults and Technology: Two Groups of Seniors Emerge

MOST CLICKED

An article within the Star Tribune entitled Where the Boomers Are generated a lot of interest…and clicks.  As they retire , boomers aren’t wooed just by maintenance-free living or one level floorplans and amenities – the location of the community plays a large part in driving the decision. And while for many urban living with all the trappings is the most appealing, many boomers are opting for a more suburban way of life.

But these newly-minted city folk have a country cousin counterpart — people who still want single-family homes and their own patch of green space, who may be sick of shoveling but aren’t ready to give up gardening.

Regardless of the locale, knowing what motivates your prospects is key to differentiating yourself and your community.

Read the full article.

 

Mature Marketing Links of the Week- Teen Content Marketing and Living Longer, Better

Monday, March 10th, 2014

I don’t know about you, but while I love that daylight savings means that it stays lighter longer, I detest the hour of sleep that is lost.  That loss won’t stop us from sharing the mature marketing news that influenced and inspired this past week.  Have something to share?  Please note in the comments below.

1. MOST CLICKED

While they may be sullen and sulky most of the time, content marketers can learn a lot about leveraging social media from teens.

While they may be sullen and sulky most of the time, content marketers can learn a lot about leveraging social media from teens.

By far the story that drew the largest amounts of clicks for the week was an article by Ann Handley, “How To Invigorate Your Marketing, Ask A Teenager”.  In her article, Handley focused on social media and chronicled how, what at times seems like a struggle for content marketers, is second nature for teens.

Then: You bought a dress at a dress shop. You wore it to prom and hoped no one else had the same dress as you. (Or if they did, you hoped you looked better in it.)
Now: “Remember that time when someone else showed up wearing the same dress to prom that I did?” said No Teen Ever.
That’s one example of the ways that people like you and me are looking to innovate with social media and content, all the while teens ( “digital natives”) are already seamlessly and naturally doing it.
Except they don’t call it “social media and content and mobile.” They just call it… living their lives.
While I doubt any mature marketing expert would dare admit it, there are many things that we can learn from how today’s teens use social media and how we can make it more engaging for our audiences. So while at times sullen, these younger generations’ ease of use teaches that  the more you can engage boomers through your social channels naturally, the more effective your content marketing will be.
2. MOST SHARED
A blog featuring an interview of the author of  the New York Times best seller, A Short Guide to a Long Life was shared by many this past week.  The book, written by Dr. David Agua, features advice for how boomers can make the most of living longer, better.  One question by the interviewer focused on how boomers can best take responsibility for their health.
The personal responsibility is our obligation to ourselves and to younger generations — we owe it to our children to be good role models. We need to train our kids to practice healthy behaviors by embracing these tips ourselves. Not only will younger generations live healthier, longer lives, but we will help prevent our own chronic illness from attacking us sooner, which means we delay the day our children will need to be our caregivers as we age.

Un-Retiring Presidents

Monday, February 17th, 2014

 

US Presidents - living and dead - represent varied approaches to retirement.

American readers of this blog are celebrating Presidents Day. There are currently five living US Presidents, representing the Greatest Generation (Jimmy Carter and George Bush, both born in 1924), leading-edge Boomers (Bill Clinton and George W Bush, both born 1946) and the trailing-edge Boomers (Barack Obama, born in 1961).* They also represent varied attitudes and approaches to retirement.

Jimmy Carter: Carter was only 56 when he was unexpectedly forced to find new employment. His response was to throw himself into volunteer groups, improving housing and health around the globe. He dramatically increased the size of Habitat for Humanity and also began his own foundation. Carter even started a club filled with people like himself — The Elders, a group of former leaders working together for peace and human rights.

George H. W. Bush: “41” has kept active in humanitarian issues but followed a more traditional retirement plan: spending time with his family, traveling, trying to stay physically active. He marked his 75th, 80th and 85th birthdays by skydiving because, as he said,

“Just because you’re an old guy, you don’t have to sit around drooling in the corner. Get out and do something. Get out and enjoy life.”

Bill Clinton: It can be hard to find a new job in your 50s. Many employers see active adults as overqualified. Therefore many job-seekers find themselves starting their own ventures, as Clinton did after leaving the White House. A foundation to address international issues such as AIDS and poverty. Partnering with industry on product distribution (or, in this case, getting manufacturers to stop selling sugary drinks in schools). Writing a book or two.

George W. Bush: “43” hasn’t started a similar encore career. His retirement has been rather quiet, with an emphasis on books (writing his own memoir and opening his Presidential Library). Like many Baby Boomers, Bush has been challenged by heart health. Unlike many others his age, he needn’t worry about health insurance and successfully underwent surgery for a blocked artery.

Despite President John Quincy Adams’ claim that “There is nothing more pathetic in life than a former president,” few have been pathetic. Few have actually retired. History shows us they’ve been rather un-retiring.

Former Presidents served on boards or even the Supreme Court. They farmed, ranched and even designed universities. They fought battles against slavery, for human rights.

What will Obama do in his retirement? He’s got a leg up on most members of “Generation Jones” — a lifetime pension and plenty of warning to begin planning his next act.

As people live longer, more Americans — including American Presidents — find themselves having to define retirement in new ways. It’s fair to say none of them will be satisfied just drooling in a corner.

 

* Incredibly, the Silent Generation, whose members were the revolutionary leaders of the 60s (civil rights, women’s rights, gay rights), has never been elected the Oval Office.

RELATED: Re-Thinking Retirement – 6 Lessons For Marketers

Photo Credit: Reuters. Our normal Monday links round-up will be delivered to you tomorrow. Happy Presidents Day!

 

Mature Marketing Links of the Week – Selfies and the “Look”

Monday, February 10th, 2014

Happy Monday!  I don’t know about you, but I’ve become obsessed with the Olympics – watching athletes go for the gold.  Here are the mature marketing articles from the past week that were singled out as golden.  Have something to share, we’d love to see it in the comment section below.

Most Shared:

In social media we creating a generation of narcissists?  This was the question posed in a recent article in Time by Peggy Drexler regarding the trend of taking and posting selfie pictures through social media. Drexler contends that new technologies have shaped every generation, including boomers, with millennials being far from the first to fall under the influence.

“Everything the baby boomers did was based on what they saw on television,” says Douglas Gomery, a media expert and journalism professor at the University of Maryland. “They grew up as television grew up, and each had an impact on the other.” The symbiotic relationship started with kid shows like Howdy Doody.

It progressed through the teen shows like American Bandstand. He says it was television coverage of Vietnam that pushed many to protest. It gave them livMature Marketing- tecnology and narcissisme coverage of events like the moon landing, JFK’s assassination and Nixon’s resignation.

The baby boomers have had their ups and downs, but they ended up a largely happy and accomplished generation. Television didn’t ruin them.

Drexler also countered the narcissism train of thought by noting that social media may actually be achieving the opposite, providing increased self- esteem by letting the selfies of the world actually help build self-confidence.

Read the article: ti.me/1fSXPUY

Most Clicked

Judy Oppenheimer received “the look” from her adult children.  As she called it, “the serious pained expression that comes over your children generally, your grown children, when they think maybe you’ve forgotten something or you’ve said something a little silly”.  Out of that look grew a story entitled Not Dead Yet: The Trials of Being – Not Caring Form, Not Dealing With But Being – An Aging Parent.

Oppenheimer spoke about her article and what she sees as a need to rethink the care conversation, allowing the parents to initiate the discussion.  A discussion that doesn’t always need to come from the assumption that just because a parent is aging they are struggling. A conversation that as marketers we can help drive by not always focusing on a problem that would facilitate the need for care.

It would be nice if we could see even in commercials now and then an intelligent comment from an elderly person because here’s the thing, as I mentioned, you know, this horrible statistic that at 85, after 85, half of us supposedly are showing some signs of dementia, which means half of us aren’t. And the fact is my father had Alzheimer’s, but also in my family I can just reel off about five cousins who are in their 90s, who are living on their own, who are just as bright and together as they ever were.

Oppenheimer went on to note that proactively preparing for the future and the impact aging has is important, but you don’t have to pity seniors or give “the look”.  Read the transcript: http://n.pr/1cos8jU


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