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Happy morning-after-the-Oscars! Did you watch the awards show all the way through last night? If you’re feeling a little down(ton) this morning, perhaps this post can Perk you up.

Lady Grantham, Downton Abbey - At my age, one must ration one's excitement.

Our weekly round-up of the top links for marketing to 50-plus consumers is brought to you by the letter P

1. MOST SHARED: P is for Persistence, the theme of a terrific post by Chris Abraham.

“What separates winning content marketing campaigns from the losers? Persistence. From my experience, too many new media marketing campaigns lack bravery, boldness, confidence, and persistence. They do the messaging equivalent of “ahem, excuse me, if you would be so kind, ahem, I don’t mean to bother you or anything, ahem” rather than “hello, my name is Chris Abraham, damned glad to meet you.”

It’s understandable, really. Brands are afraid of the online world, especially earned media, where anything that a brand says and does can be used against it. So, over time, shell-shocked from seeing everyone around them being shot down and rejected; and, after repeatedly being warned by the media and by social media gurus as to how much of a mine field blogger outreach is, once-bitten, twice shy.

If you want to be successful in search marketing, earned media marketing, and content marketing, you’ll need to reach out not once, twice, but three times.”

Read the post: http://bit.ly/1jM37Vv


2. MOST CLICKED (a tie):
P is for Peers, specifically the Granthams of Masterpiece Theater’s Downton Abbey. Kathy East last week shared 5 things 50 plus marketing can learn from this popular TV show. From respect to teamwork to how to dress for success, these lessons generated excitement among Creating Results’ followers in the Twitter and Facebook universes.

Read the post: Five Things Downton Abbey Can Teach Us About Selling to Seniors

P also is for Priorities, the question posed by Tom Ahern in his post, “Which Is Your Next Priority: Younger Donors or Boomers?”

“You see, age matters. It’s not that younger donors are less generous. It’s just that they have so much more to buy: clothes, cars, furnishings, homes, education for their eventual kids. Older donors have been there, done that.

A person aged 65 is far more likely to have two things a young adult won’t have: (1) enough stuff, and (2) a sense that time is running out.”

Read the post: http://bit.ly/1dTfmL5

case study - 50 plus marketing audit, strategy for Tufts University Planned GivingWe have had the pleasure of working with and speaking to planned giving professionals during the past few years. (On their behalf we ask, have you made your charitable plan?) I am always blown away by the Persistence and Professionalism of these folks. Their Priorities are the People (donors) and organizations they serve, and they seem to strike the Perfect balance between the two.

RELATED: The Power of Generational Marketing – slides from a presentation to the National Conference for Philanthropic Planning, with actionable tips for marketing to the 50 plus donor.

Case Study: How Creating Results helped Tufts University’s Planned Giving Department with insights into 50+ marketing

 

We hope you’ll Post your comments — on the Oscars, these links or my terrible Puns — below. Thanks!

About The Author

Erin Read

For nearly 13 years, Erin Read spearheaded integrated and digital marketing programs for Creating Results' clients. She directed and co-authored four national studies/eBooks (Photo Finish and three editions of Social, Silver Surfers) and served as the principal blogger for Mature Marketing Matters. Now a consultant to the agency, Erin is leveraging her expertise in marketing to baby boomers and seniors while tackling new challenges. Find her on LinkedIn .