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Every Monday we recap the top links of the week, the resources shared via Twitter, LinkedIn or other social platforms that most engaged our audience. This week’s round-up has a senior care slant to it. However the central idea — that the structures and institutions currently serving our elder population will not be able to do so in the future — applies to many industries. We’d love to hear your thoughts, below!

senior-housing-forum-logo1. MOST CLICKED: Steve Moran of Senior Housing Forum and Bill Thomas of Changing Aging declare war on the traditional way of providing nursing home care.

Moran first quotes Thomas, a self-declared “nursing-home abolitionist:”

“Buoyed by astonishingly low expectations and a reimbursement system that literally pays them for making their patients sicker and weaker, nursing homes represent the one part of our health care system that has seen little substantive change in more than half a century … Imagine the difference it would make if every state committed to revoking the licenses of the 10, 30 or 50 worst nursing homes within its borders– and they did so every single year.”

Thomas’ fire prompted further incendiary language from Moran:

 

“We have a system that gives us what we have. A reimbursement system that is not adequate to provide decent care, a living wage to line staff, and a decent bottom line for providers.

We have a patchwork system that demands vast amounts of time be spent on documentation in order to stay out of the hair of regulators and to protect owners from predatory attorneys.

We have a cat & mouse payment system that provides the greatest amount of compensation for the most interventions without a lot of attention being paid to outcomes.”

Read the post: http://bit.ly/1BLycDa. We’re curious to see the conversation it will spark!

2. MOST SHARED: Todd Harff and I had the privilege of speaking at the 2015 Ziegler/Leading Age Massachusetts Senior Living Symposium last week, where there was a lot of discussion about the future of nursing homes.

It’s not quite abolition, but demographic shifts are impacting the system already. People are moving to independent living older and sicker; as a response, many continuing care retirement communities are shifting away from skilled nursing and into high acuity assisted living.

System Trends - LeadingAge Ziegler 2015

Lisa McCracken of Ziegler noted two factors that will impact how nursing care and all senior living evolves in Massachusetts:

1) the state’s 65+ population is rising faster than the national average

2) 8.8% of Massachusetts’ 65+ seniors are at or below the poverty level (vs. 9.6% of U.S. seniors)

That latter statistic became our most shared item of the week.

3. Also of note: Two more items related to the evolution of senior housing.

* Creating Your Own Retirement Community – Next Avenue, as seen in Forbes – http://onforb.es/1CmONj2

* Aging Single Americans To Push Senior Housing Demand – Senior Housing News – http://bit.ly/1FrNoa6

RELATED: “All The Singular Ladies”

 

What do YOU think? What kind of transformation, if any, is ahead for nursing homes, senior living or other elder-focused businesses? Please share your comments below.

 

About The Author

Erin Read

For nearly 13 years, Erin Read spearheaded integrated and digital marketing programs for Creating Results' clients. She directed and co-authored four national studies/eBooks (Photo Finish and three editions of Social, Silver Surfers) and served as the principal blogger for Mature Marketing Matters. Now a consultant to the agency, Erin is leveraging her expertise in marketing to baby boomers and seniors while tackling new challenges. Find her on LinkedIn .