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Quote: Aging is not lost youth but a new stage of opportunity and strength. Betty Friedan.

This week’s round-up of the top Mature Marketing links of the week illustrates the strength of (aging) tribes and the opportunities provided by originality. On with the links!

1. MOST CLICKED: Regardless of what age you’re marketing too, if you’re marketing online you keep one eye on your consumer and two on Google. When is it appropriate to stray from best practices and ignore Google? Mark Schaefer defines five situations when you can ignore the search engine and succeed through originality, including:

* When You’re Epic – “If you’re creating content so consistently compelling that you have become part of the conversation, you really can work outside the boundaries of Google, right?”

* When You’re Huge – and he’s not talking about being the biggest provider of assisted living in Tennessee …

* When It Doesn’t Matter Anymore – Schaefer points out “over time, Google has made its search results highly-tailored to your environment. Where are you? Who are you? Who are your friends? This has resulted in an ever-tightening bubble of personalized results.” In the future, he suggests, there might be new tools that find items with even greater relevance and push them to you.

That said, Creating Results’ research shows baby boomers and seniors are not yet those using new tools. As we wrote in Social, Silver Surfers:

“it’s Google’s world and we all live in it. 71% of all the recent movers in our study used Search Engines as part of their move decision.”

Chart: online tools used by recent movers, by age.
Source: Social, Silver Surfers ebook —

So perhaps it’s a bit early for most readers of this blog to stop jibing with Google.

Read the full post:

2. MOST SHARED: How do Australia’s consumer “tribes” shop? A leading forecaster says it’s important to understand the differences between generations, as GenY is set to overtake baby boomers as the nation’s biggest spenders. According to an article in The Sydney Morning Herald,

“Baby Boomers, now mostly in their 60s, are being called “flat agers” because they do not want to be defined by their age. They are travel happy, meaningful spenders … Next are the “multi-tasking” Generation Jones-ers, now in their 50s, who are community-focused, cautious spenders. They prefer high-quality, sustainable products from brands with a strong back story.”

I’m not sure I’d agree with all of the forecaster’s assessments — especially with the creative labeling of a “cohort” born after 2003 as “phygitally active” — but it’s worth a read:

3. Also of note:

Did you know that jibe can mean both to be compatible with and an insulting remark? You might be offended by those who jibe at older adults, as was Marc Agronin in the Wall Street Journal, who explored “Why is aging still a joke?”:

Or you might jibe with this cartoon, by the talented John Atkinson:

Cartoon - Vintage Social Networking - John Atkinson, WrongHands

Please share a comment and let us know which part of this post jibed with your tribe!

About The Author

Erin Read

For nearly 13 years, Erin Read spearheaded integrated and digital marketing programs for Creating Results' clients. She directed and co-authored four national studies/eBooks (Photo Finish and three editions of Social, Silver Surfers) and served as the principal blogger for Mature Marketing Matters. Now a consultant to the agency, Erin is leveraging her expertise in marketing to baby boomers and seniors while tackling new challenges. Find her on LinkedIn .