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Before we discuss this week’s most engaging content, we would like to send our thoughts and prayers to everyone affected by the Las Vegas shooting last night. The Creating Results team offers our support as we try to make sense of the world we’re living in.

In this week’s most clicked item, The Huffington Post identifies the top motivators for adults age 50 and better to remain in optimal health as they age. And in this week’s most shared item, senior blogger Ronni Bennett offers insights for adapting to the physical, emotional, social, calamitous and cultural challenges of aging.

Most Clicked: Staying Independent and In-Control is Enough Motivation for 50+s To Get Healthy

According to The Huffington Post, a new survey revealed that the ability to stay independent and in control is the number one motivation for adults age 50 and above to adopt healthy lifestyle habits.

International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) and Abbott’s Ensure conducted a survey of 600 participants, ages 50 and better to gain a better understanding of priorities, motivations and views regarding healthiness, nutrition and activity.

  • 72% of those surveyed said the top motivation for being healthy and active is to STAY independent
    • Other top motivators were: traveling, working and spending time with family
  • 39% of respondents said that they are motivated by fear of experiencing a health setback
    • 21% of respondents reported that if health setback is severe enough, then it could have a significant impact on employment, finances and could be burdensome to family members
  • 97% of all who were surveyed agreed that having a positive attitude can add precious years to your life and can largely contribute to recovery if suffering through a health setback
  • 30% of those surveyed advised their younger selves to “prepare for retirement” and 27% said they would have told their younger selves to “eat healthier”

As marketers to this demographic, we must be mindful of these motivations to stay healthy. We know boomers want to stay independent and in control for as long as possible. At Creating Results, we suggest our clients should not only promote independence and control, but more importantly a healthier lifestyle.

One of our clients, Traditions of America, strategically positions itself as an “Active 55+ Community” and promotes an active lifestyle that appeals to their target market. The ad campaign we developed for them uses language and imagery that emphasizes healthy living.

Click here to read full article.

Traditions of America print ads
Our Live Better ad campaign for Traditions of America emphasizes a healthy, active lifestyle.

Most Shared: Growing Old – The Good, Bad & Ugly

In a recent post on the senior living blog Time Goes By, Ronni Bennett discusses the changes seniors must go through as they grow older and how these changes are developing at a rapid pace. However, the post acknowledges that, contrary to public perception, there are some positives about growing older but, undeniably, significant loss is another part of the process.

To seniors, aging can mean needing hearing and vision aids, or dental implants and hair dye. But it can also mean failing health and major changes to quality of life.

Bennett has identified five major categories that the changes of growing older fall into.

  1. Physical – conditions & limitations to the physical body
  2. Emotional – dealing with loss, physical impairments, understanding of current life stage
  3. Social – lack of social engagement due to retirement, loss, financial restrictions, etc.
  4. Calamitous – severe illness/loss
  5. Cultural – society’s archaic views on old age

To read Ronni Bennett’s full blog post click here.

What do you think of the five categories of changes that Ronni Bennett has identified in the aging process? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

About The Author

Allison Lloyd Dongoski

As Marketing Programs Manager, Allison implements integrated marketing campaigns and advertising strategies. She efficiently coordinates and tracks media placements to help clients achieve their goals. Allison draws on an extensive educational background, which includes an MBA in marketing from American Public University, as well as 10 years of experience in customer service and sales. Allison applies her research and analytical skills in collecting, analyzing and summarizing data for client and competitive reports.