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Posts By Erin Read

I have a long-lasting love of pigs.

A few things reminded me of this affection last week.

One, a discussion with my college-bound teens about what should or should not go with them to university. She wants to bring her Harry Potter wand. I stopped protesting after recalling that I headed off to "adulthood" with three stuffed pigs, including one who snorted loudly when stepped on in the middle of the night. (My roommates loved me.)

Two, this tweet from our Director of Business Development, Beth Spohn:

Each Monday, we round-up the top 50-plus marketing resources of the previous week. Today's post quickly shaped itself around a certain letter ...

D is for "DISRUPT."

Our MOST CLICKED item of the week was a post by Jo Ann Jenkins, the CEO of AARP, titled "It's Time to Disrupt Aging."

Jenkins reinforces what readers of this blog know: societal perceptions of aging have changed.

"Middle-aged," for instance, was once viewed as starting at 35; now it's 55 or older. Those who are middle-aged also are not behaving the way their grandparents did.

And yet, as Jenkins writes ...

Way back in 2010 Creating Results asked recent, mature movers what frustrated them about housing websites.

#1 with a bullet? "Don't say price."

We asked the question of hundreds of Social, Silver Surfers because we wanted data to back up our recommendations to senior living providers. Our team kept saying "you need to talk online about your pricing" and their teams kept saying "no!"

Now that recommendation carries even more weight, thanks to the team at Lead InSite.

Top 50+ marketing links of the week focus on Gen X

Each Monday, our team collects a few "top links" related to marketing to older adults and shares them on the Mature Marketing Matters blog.

MOST CLICKED: Give a shout if you're a member of Generation X. A little louder? A little louder? Hmmm. I still can't hear you.

The problem isn't with your voice.

It's with advertisers' ears.

The Gen X cohort (disclosure: my cohort) has been largely ignored by marketers of all ages. Born between 1968 and 1979, we're not as rowdy or large as the cohort that came before us, the Baby Boomers. We're high-tech, low-maintenance and we're entering our peak earning years (or should be).

And yet, as Robert Klara wrote in AdWeek:

Today's round-up of top posts for marketing to older adults is like a "choose your own adventure" novel.

Feeling business-like? Check out the insights into marketing preferences via MarketingSherpa. Curious about mortality? The CDC's stats on centenarians should interest you. Ready for a good cry? Grab your hankie and listen to Maurice Sendak's words of wisdom.

MOST CLICKED: How do Baby Boomers want to discover and then learn more about products? And how do their preferences differ from that other big cohort, the Millennials?

Baby boomer using cell phone

Happy Leap Day! The calendar is generously giving us a few extra hours -- use them to catch up on work, for folly, for whatever.

In that spirit, we'll try to give you a little something extra in this weekly round-up of the links that rose to the top with boomer and senior marketing pros in recent days.

MOST SHARED: Creating Results' Director of Media Strategies has a talent for making complex media changes more easily understood ... and acted upon.

I love it when my passions align.

1. MOST CLICKED: Is the wine industry forecast becoming cloudy, as "oenophile boomers" are replaced by frugal Millennials?

That's what the Silicon Valley Bank predicts in its annual State of the Wine Industry report. (How am I not a subscriber?) Beverage World reports that the bank is placing the blame squarely on the younger generation.

"While demand for premium wine will increase this year, there are clouds on the horizon that should be considered. We believe total and per capita wine consumption in the U.S. will drop for the first time in more than 20 years due to emerging generational shifts in consumption patterns that we see accelerating in the near term," says Rob McMillan, founder of Silicon Valley Bank's Wine Division and author of the report.

Many of our readers may have included fitness in their 2016 New Years Resolutions. But what about "brain fitness," that new and growing industry based on the concept that we can rewire and strengthen our neural pathways as we age?

This week's round-up of mature marketing articles and resources shares recent brain fitness news. The post also addresses news itself -- specifically, newspapers, that older and shrinking industry based on the concept of delivering local topics on printed sheets of paper. We wrap it all up with a quote timely for today, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Read on!

1. MOST SHARED: Per Alvaro Fernandez, chief executive of SharpBrains, a market research firm SharpBrains, "worldwide revenues of the brain fitness industry surged to more than $1 billion in 2012 from $200 million in 2005 and are expected to surpass $6 billion by 2020."

This post features two quick hits relevant to those marketing to 55 plus consumers. You'll also quickly note a theme ... Read on for why!

Betting on Brands

MarketingSherpa last year conducted an online-only survey in which they looked at who follows brands on social media. Key findings included:

"The older generations were also less likely to follow brands. Only 35% of 55-64 year olds and 35% of participants 65 years and older followed brands on social media, compared to 95% of 18-34 year olds, 92% of 35-44 year olds and 85% of 45-54 year olds."

This was pretty much in line with Creating Results' ongoing studies of Social, Silver Surfers. Our multi-year research into the preferences of older adults shows a great resistance to becoming a social follower.

Happy New Year! Like many, our office went into stealth mode during the last weeks of 2015, as our team enjoyed the holidays with family and friends. Yet the Internet doesn't sleep ...

Here are a few items that caught the attention of 50+ marketing pros during recent weeks:

1. MOST CLICKED: The Silver Group calls this "a stunning video shows ageism is alive and well," and we agree. Australia's Apia Insurance staged a stunt -- really a social experiment -- with a group of dynamic 50+ers and a separate group of young advertisers.