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Why does my car give me such a strong physical and emotional reaction? Is it the little logo on the back bumper? As the Creating Results team tells our clients, a brand is not just a logo design. It is the entire consumer experience.

A brand is the fundamental emotional experience that you want consumers to have every time they come in contact with your product – it’s employees, residents, services, or even its physical space, campus or buildings within. It’s why consistency and clarity are essential.

Creating Results has had the pleasure of working on many branding projects. Efforts for a Boomer-focused tourism destination and for a senior living organization can help to illustrate how a brand’s personality can influence the design of a logo.

Welcome back from the long holiday weekend! While it may not be Monday, we didn't want you to miss out on this week's roundup of the most engaging content.

This week, Laura Forer of MarketingProfs6u answers the age old question: when should you post on social media? Additionally, Christopher S. Penn, Vice President of Marketing Technology at SHIFT Communications reminds us about what we should be focusing on when we market our products and services.

Kids are heading back to school and we have less than a month to go of summer. Between deadlines at work and (maybe) planning that one last hurrah for the summer, we hope you have allocated a bit of time to catch up with the most engaging content in this week's Monday roundup.

First, we'll look at the improvements LeadingAge suggests we make to long-term care and support services.

In the second overview, we'll gear up for the amenity wars with Property Management Insider and learn about the ways you can upgrade your community.

Every Monday we review our most engaging and shared articles from the previous week. First up this week; more seniors than ever are using their mobile devices to access the news. In the 50+ marketing item, we report how industry leaders, experts and providers are coming together to fight ageism. Most Shared: Seniors Enjoy News At Their Fingertips According to McKnight's Senior…

Happy Monday! Each week we review the mature marketing content that had people talking (and thinking). This week we hear the stories of three individuals who retired and then had second thoughts.  Then, our most shared content explores storytelling and shares tips for how you can make it shine.  Have something to share? We'd love to hear your thoughts and…

When we're designing websites for older adults, a client sometimes will ask, "Can it have ____? I saw it on such-and-such's website and it's so cool!"

I'm a creative person so I like cool.

But I like results even more.

What's cool and trendy can, at times, actually turn off the baby boomers and seniors our clients are trying to attract. These mature consumers don't want fuss and bother. They want functional, easy-to-use tools that help them make decisions and take action.

That said, there are two "trends" I think are relevant to our older adult targets.

Happy Monday! Like every Monday, we are reviewing the most engaging content from the previous week. This week, for our "most clicked" item, we look at a project from Stanford Center on Longevity. For the "most shared," is the fashion industry ignoring Baby Boomers?

Most Clicked:  The Sightlines Project

How long do you want to live? 76, 92, or even 101? According to The Sightlines Project from the Stanford Center on Longevity, three out of four Americans want to live past 100 IF they are in good health.

The research highlights three key findings to live a long and vigorous life:

SESSION: “How the Macroeconomics of Healthcare and Shifting Demographics are Changing the Future of Aging Services”

SPEAKER: James Orlikoff, consultant named one of the 100 most powerful people in healthcare

Orlikoff noted that big trends such as macroeconomics and demographics are already impacting providers of health services to older adults. These have given consumers more choice than ever before, which is actually a risk to providers. Why? The average consumer can not only choose your competitors, he/she can choose not to use the service at all. (Most American consumers do not have enough cash to purchase care on their own, so they’ll stop using healthcare and/or default on medical bills.) To stay relevant regardless of whatever curve ball the healthcare game may pitch next, Orlikoff encouraged attendees to focus on four strategies: